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The Cycle of Listening, Part IIwd0ycasfjregwyx72qgqmlkwjgc4g8q2The Cycle of Listening, Part II

By jessica on February 25, 2014
(English → 中文) View original
Translators:

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.xnaucrg39q5gh67zjx5aovzg9qsniy16

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.zzzak04hlaj8tcvsnjr375hievluemw3

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.y3ari5ph03e2hdj89uae10wiv2ahidy7

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.dgoa4k73hn8dwqq9surqmg7c4tt0unlx

The Right Tool for the Jobu2zakpalwy47k9w7v5s1yc4t3i05yw5j

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. ol1tdoth68x4kp6qzwegoi29c8kzxenbIt’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.patrwrpycgcf3u041hxbrynd4khvv8cb

We have left out analytic tools like Facebooki5ih55lle47l6jngpoy05kxhudxpsmp0 Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.nsbdriovibhc98yo0l5ufj0u5012pkj3

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.k2tsgi5wpprna1h5o49xvtvpotex1egb

Online Listening Tools4sk06baeo8k5qzrqzah4o0kadbnriryd

Listening Dashboardsd65lpymqb9uis1iifpsytmnwr6x4anee

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.d6kbn37td5ry8fmn9v6e5mgzbq231l84

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.usdtl7atsg59eytld67qz0vyaf996csq
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
    1paxvr3etf1wckgfb05vyz76plv9y72q
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.0pmya1elpjnnrz095bg2x4ab11dn3kft
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed9dfje9a2n9kae9mhnxyp3ip5n5lr6dk5

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.io2lxl82isv77jfmpv043r1g8xi0ufp3

<span class=New Content Feed9dfje9a2n9kae9mhnxyp3ip5n5lr6dk5s" title="New Content Feed9dfje9a2n9kae9mhnxyp3ip5n5lr6dk5s" style="PADDING-TOP: 15px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px;"/>
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.7puzo30le668vtnrwv2n3mg3195oj46g
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.becno08tie1vmsu8twxbu76psgm4k23l
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.2axr6m25nxtq5t20qbp5hs8b5tegsf1l
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.mve7ut6w8alreaueuq5ojuxp3razf9ur

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.7osns5v26fvabvlmgxmp9r7pp4ai9yf7

Twitter Listeningo0cnn6wxbj4uvod4i1g82dshgljf3tth

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.fex96aqsz3f7eqnxygrmrienv0ubwru2

  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.313we9g9qvn2qmebc3gyp7cn1xh2vpyp
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.szii6tau9ukp79koafw467ovhl4l63qp
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.xoi6670kvkxvgqrnph9sfawz8b3kq16d
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.eat5lbkksca5lqekarrkq4sf5h8naq5e
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.b1bxrb38fh6mcy1c3n31cqiw1l92aq6b
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.a5mepf69ca2y0h896y4c6lxe0tg7xipx

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.jgbr931o5xexcww9w8suucx4ijpytli3

Facebooki5ih55lle47l6jngpoy05kxhudxpsmp0

  • Facebooki5ih55lle47l6jngpoy05kxhudxpsmp0 – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebooki5ih55lle47l6jngpoy05kxhudxpsmp0, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebooki5ih55lle47l6jngpoy05kxhudxpsmp0 may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Togethern1dd9oeig596d453fadkykeex6t9r635

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.hsqp1frovu0dtgxj5nwstgo1dnru6t3d

    Remember:2ohey8x9pdq9f7qkih1n291ywnsjeuw6

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identifiedqg1s4n56tkfigqkrnswwic3vz8ig9npp
  2. Identify opportunitiesczp8ies6iilrsmx38r6nqi16wvkabgod
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?k31cgfkewc8cpgax40a8ewa42kfxbi2l
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?ovxswrr1vz1v5jjor6r95b2mowfho8n2
    • What vocabulary are people using?c1lf4q0i49a8zya36th43j25wc3qo6sq
    • How does it differ?tdnxz91w9d1s0qllpfb6w54f4tb5z16i
    • Who is talking about your issue?9p8fca29e09cj1e3925qq9p8ec3ktf4t
    • Who is connecting with you?v3h48k8u8jz7oaomlea4g22mwtm81fem
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?19nrgjztztr2i6yi000zws1m39ai1wit
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategynofxdc5ebuhz5frkvv5d5lf14at89fbn
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:btlklavc2mquztiy9hvqlaw2tphhregs

    • Connect with influencersxmhi252ij9jvffr7w7urcq62ylh24n2s
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of courservutcwy6hya2ds265kezqnhqx2g62tlj
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.sxtaz2kxjcj3l8b1pga0r654chb5n3u5
  4. Keep listening to see how it is workingq9vaul3b5grn4030r24jka7e3yk1gxqx
  5. Practice and improve2i944uhh3n0d2dehzg5ryphj2f04u3rn

Special Thanksti7hlwarml8lajpj5ilg4onkcfc3hbf0

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.vcfxuoy5gnnw5qccs47a5zooi3nceiuz

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!ohxhozvwjgyqeg2jad3m21ef3f3byw6d

(original) View 中文 translation

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.

The Right Tool for the Job

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. It’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.

We have left out analytic tools like Facebook Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.

Online Listening Tools

Listening Dashboards

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.

New Content Feeds
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.

Twitter Listening

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.

Twitter Listening Tools
  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.

Facebook

  • Facebook – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebook, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebook may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Together

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.

    Remember:

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identified
  2. Identify opportunities
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?
    • What vocabulary are people using?
    • How does it differ?
    • Who is talking about your issue?
    • Who is connecting with you?
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategy
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:

    • Connect with influencers
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of course
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.
  4. Keep listening to see how it is working
  5. Practice and improve

Special Thanks

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!



The Listening Cycle, Part Ieq9jgqq1qd51kl96mzxwzr01l5v3vdszThe Listening Cycle, Part I

By jessica on February 14, 2014
(English → 中文) View original
Translators:

Beyonce wants you to listeneqm0hfr0fded7hcc2ycn1u6zd0n34i49

Beyonce says Listen

Image source:youtube.comb4ij4drmfxqqnu2emztznticnsq6zut0

The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.sqtijhu4u83jbvqtprusy6etlges3kcl

Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. fp2nmhmh8n4yoktqojeqr1h52xczxff3However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.rc1qg918bffsfs1wnrsk4koen89yhs9y

We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.ntti160rowph2aaqfedr8v2nb5ul6d3j

This blog post will teach you how to:oesyoclj8rg1aqjl0taa9w8j8kq396vn
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.sbknl5s42soffhu4vny6i7mgrk9azpoi
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.3x17ffoc4lz9662audtid8sotv5qijzc
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.p8f4davzl7srlsa1zks0m6k6y86swr2b
  • How to get started:bjt2cm2n2cks1d1a4rsjc4d72l6v9h6b

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. l4rehezpn5kkj148w9ob2nq5t2ev01ncOnce you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.0316kayq04urojdk5e9iohmwzghjp4if

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.bq0qdldh3e5lw8lq444c10snjrehqhbs

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.20pkfr7we1i2qna8cwatprad10np6kly

    Keywords to listen to may include:j8wbttru6rb9lb0yodh01is9ecdhnmux
    Organization(s) involvedamhxcg3ocs34mdr8marv75veaq6vfkug Spokespeople for or against the issuep3r7xu2879dbavjkeydkbzsng5r14opj
    Executive Director or CEO85qo31oirm4citafzus3uhgjd2mi7gy5 Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you support9q7487a9bhwv8r2t2r7md0mxthihsq7s
    Key leader(s) of the campaign5pzxt4rtog62ert5txttgciphel6huld Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of6rydzbv2qbxlmpl0wtpuhc7lwtyn24uz
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.881l61iwxaaa61slsl0jj1tlhmt0c5fb

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.s290eb6aqc52ipxeeo3tksb63q3ppss7

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.z0onpvzert27zu3rui1g1s5ejwq9jo38

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.og3sifa0tagdghr4tvz4jsznzkcsc2vr

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.iho3urps06tth1xh2x6kexkg587l03h9

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.pigy4rhtwj5umam38wrkdrgkyic8nrf3

    Testing… testingywj24vtoklxo6cvwobkx1wkpuen4yofm

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.csyl9bts24r0mpkx7uirnuck3no5rzlu

    Let’s walk through an example36i7ag55q6kv5rtq6rtmtzgpijh12e3w

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker”zipbyrpv49h5zg7yh63wslov3szxpyqe and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”arhd75pmmu5bdokj2o01hha24a30c1lc. Neutral00uv0gh8jz392pgn9ubz4307y6ox5k1w parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”arhd75pmmu5bdokj2o01hha24a30c1lc, interchangeably.apt2jgf641vvs01uu9v49bcbtbmo7kj7

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.67lvmve8h0n3y1b7mxitdoq3h9qdxoft
     floy5zpkm1fxz21hjcsnjsspu3z752db Alliesjao4mdxsrra3qjqygw4bsciblcg57ibg Neutral00uv0gh8jz392pgn9ubz4307y6ox5k1w Opponentsrwfh12b2oidmlq7ypsmusp3cukhaxgif
    Search Terms84mpxnviy86ayefnjqajlgl7owo2w08u “sex worker”zipbyrpv49h5zg7yh63wslov3szxpyqe Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”arhd75pmmu5bdokj2o01hha24a30c1lc
    8erxzw1qsaq01if8xlwqxprzh59syc7w
    “prostitute”arhd75pmmu5bdokj2o01hha24a30c1lc

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.4vzxjymupny6mebp2xeww2zcqmjhffg9

      What I can learn from listening:x0ghuqi3agrivljv15rqrlo2sfyxy99m

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickro0ulahxgvsfo2ogllvmerl6o5ifyvxa9

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.hntnmrcog280sdor23hq54cxptbvwr34
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?bsbpyk9x1wkdk4fg3cvlk73pu6sei60k
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”arhd75pmmu5bdokj2o01hha24a30c1lc? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker”zipbyrpv49h5zg7yh63wslov3szxpyqe and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker”zipbyrpv49h5zg7yh63wslov3szxpyqe but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute”arhd75pmmu5bdokj2o01hha24a30c1lc without “sex worker”zipbyrpv49h5zg7yh63wslov3szxpyqe the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.qpmfochv5p36pahh1wmei5d03wud659n

    Who? What? Now, Where?uizuno60lbd64epqo34eq350pqufjdu3

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.o5hegzlrpm7jvmyw6b0rn5d9s3axmr70

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickrqmk45ppkvkjpxx5h129x6ayrtum9cqrs

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:j8kozzmtgvujomvo0s5r2t5ieo17w3l6

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?3t1nm6qk08m2e2n1m61s3uuwulf6zvct
    • Are they a Facebook user?oqsb1hw5crcy1tx2yi66b57sulgv7w4m
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?an2iysk86b2cok8lcvckkglqv403gyxg

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.9c88cu46yidj07ga4tiqdo22px7udz4c

    • Where do they get their news and information from?i8tcvgy0mkne1rpll9t3jb584bh7oemw
    • Whose information are they sharing?thp6npcpkrelzm02t4ubx9gd3tybll65
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?nqkhyg8v0gnbfgaz1zuitnp02rwdzqod

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.mgrquisba6g0r4jpug27nw7xf45oztxb

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.vqyle6583bsh4jpp2q7ptnp5xuewww7i

    Where from here?ckil875lqfjj5u073c18m9ae5tma7qm9

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.qxx4vno8qzvv37prnvil883sgm7dk2u1

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.ss423xt41irnydu29yld9z3dk7hjx86g

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?tul094fvlej6obmxuc0ws0s9i5d110xk

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Beyonce wants you to listen

    Beyonce says Listen

    Image source:youtube.com

    The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

    Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.

    We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.

    This blog post will teach you how to:
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.
  • How to get started:

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. Once you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.

    Keywords to listen to may include:
    Organization(s) involved Spokespeople for or against the issue
    Executive Director or CEO Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you support
    Key leader(s) of the campaign Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.

    Testing… testing

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.

    Let’s walk through an example

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker” and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”. Neutral parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”, interchangeably.

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.
      Allies Neutral Opponents
    Search Terms “sex worker” Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”
    “prostitute”

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.

      What I can learn from listening:

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickr

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker” and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker” but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute” without “sex worker” the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.

    Who? What? Now, Where?

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickr

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?
    • Are they a Facebook user?
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.

    • Where do they get their news and information from?
    • Whose information are they sharing?
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.

    Where from here?

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?



    Text Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizingmt1rpipholiqm05hnarbl9p7w3chz5dbText Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizing

    By Jordan Ramos on January 30, 2014
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.5z3lp6zo0rxq47qm3xm8pytqisxy00hv



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?ox5aee3z7qrwnzx6fncwpke6ii89pyz4

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.am6ywstptxmjfym5c7pjg5larq77qdwr

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. aj7xe0gbixm4o750ypxmarcyx5b25025Because it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.99w6sk0rs5xbjdwqr6mbmiccsi1cm2am

    Just a few use-cases:qzlf6527ku80vjnglnbhg9uq5ca4l412

         Harassment reporting and mapcryumzrvjh00bmv78bti7p5qspsozvn1

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, educationdqj1bpe6pxuocfkr2kkn7cq7tyli7b6a

         Mobile Clinic communicationscyqsprgmhnnu73tzvi9u02ql5bb95vw8

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in needqfi2s6w6ulxjul2b56uj4elut7wfuyrb

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in Indiauqwzrilbtq72spbksvc2vuwdf2e087vs



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Thinkg1aw7vszau038tjtw2c2ms6v2xw3lfzs

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:a6rz1577d5cyh1ahftqficwm6au26tc7
    1. Intimate/Direct651r426rql3m3ijboyumm5reb6f8cw79

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.vpu5vkga4zx49aqfuge420oimykdzknl

    1. Immediatezzp2tw5fl37n6dhoh5wmtfg08tjfca82

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.ymi191qyie3hcwn42yxg5tvzp1rkhka6

    1. Always on, Everywherekfwhpdxlh1dha0wv7nfhe8o0uw95uae5

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.e1d115ub2b6bip41odab9suqw7o3w480

    1. Accessiblejphw7sovu0v5th0lf5em1hnbo6hvnjpx

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.3nk3eibo1hpbdt7ose6slnrbphtqwirq




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operationqq6ify2yasmlfnuczav2uuei21r1kn00

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).hn94y2ebytxggo3nxqof0hzngx2eu2i2

    So, what can you do, then?0p8k39i20o6z74u0imkgjz5jdcfdfu86

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:19719f4ckky0flmvl1zik0cgbsbujn0b

    • Send/receive messages7j9ygcuqor5rymy28buq03wvwvirefbb
    • Manage contacts and groups of contactsid0j6jpuzdtu34aboujtwv9xazhhndjw
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messagesmas7lucftejqpu3u166o4o4tsg06debp

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:5c9orjg6d9b9ysupm2kq5psppee5y7ku

    • What is required to run it,4obo4kz2iwkbh3npooxazbdihe5kt2zn
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),fx7headqg3a0xyxnv2xhuq55xuln78id
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,of5uvv60hj0qnm882mv7i8to7vxntx67
    • Set-up (time and energy), andphmtjjs9jesre3z3n1sqj9h25samf7fu
    • Scale.yw7xkomm7y24x5rw3h348w382740p5fe

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.wbn6d54fpg8jnklnvq200cqe6av0cs0z



    Use Responsibly5f0tb6enlcwn3ez0ag64oqhcvzqodtw8

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:j05ccju5to37ejam9rx69fyzw1uye8xn
    1. Consentmxf1su0q5qb31s3ommkki8twfjwn4r8h

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. 2h6sifk111cbwqluh6krmkvjiucse5c6This way they won’t feel trapped!0tqavgmf6olvg1euiaetyoyu9ulp7i9y

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequency1v7q057681dwoz5q36bvhpmq79yoba03

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.13eze7smjro3jneyxn02ag54k47yau91

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!u8dk8hovl1hxrcm3xddvozbv5x3ec62w

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.qpnctwnfgz94wcvx61zkat7macp2iaxz

    1. Privacywutz1cwvpr0z88nuk57fq0omh9cc092n

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.bq80naeiptct63cv4onrtzzh9jwwck8e

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.zve5vr5ggm3oi04a1bwns7gjhhkpd1e2

    Getting Started3s6usktjs5ukn9fue51110cfiz4wlkpe

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:rguz0jkijflgh5p8sa8ezqtgpf96lku3
    • Who is my audience? How large?ddlnfc8ldztcmw0sn5wb817e8yudb4nf
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?h9vcu4eo7017r5sbiz1oyc2a8yc214f8
    • What do I need the service to do?k64i9xjrjjr3vv3cvb51o4wo8fd9q561
    • What do different services require or cost?o3e768pudkzzimvvq5affys3rgeyzohd
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?xzyb7c16j3scko55o3la32dqnupt93zw
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?od1w8zd16n2p3qdymie59pgu17zpj0gx

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    53qnmjxzgcvdxdm5fzkc3yg8wkpgi26d

    Resources4txei4zx826ksjcd9friw6ym8wx8h4eb

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]adpsr49gmghkxs2zxfc0vjuq2pkv4ad5

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacyrlwi56teenar9gs78d0769c3wjam2t2k

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.
    c3g7hl2z5hwyk7r56j7e9g4hwqihxlwz

    (original) View 中文 translation
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. Because it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.

    Just a few use-cases:

         Harassment reporting and map

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, education

         Mobile Clinic communications

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in need

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in India



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Think

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:
    1. Intimate/Direct

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.

    1. Immediate

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.

    1. Always on, Everywhere

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.

    1. Accessible

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operation

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).

    So, what can you do, then?

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:

    • Send/receive messages
    • Manage contacts and groups of contacts
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messages

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:

    • What is required to run it,
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,
    • Set-up (time and energy), and
    • Scale.

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.



    Use Responsibly

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:
    1. Consent

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. This way they won’t feel trapped!

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequency

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.

    1. Privacy

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.

    Getting Started

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:
    • Who is my audience? How large?
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?
    • What do I need the service to do?
    • What do different services require or cost?
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    Resources

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacy

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.



    Trust in the Cloudqmzwuhck4ko5a8ckho01pejb4tkld1ltTrust in the Cloud

    By misty on December 4, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?hyihpifxig3qa9qixa0jfbaj67ostlw0

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)lngv6kq76kec041460q5idcqyzbqmgox

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleadingb370yeu3g0lg5sm1r4399ch04wdr66g8

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.vmkkf58w0b6abzcojvjjuh72200oljp7

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.r03agvc0x04gbis8s526pxtp96gq0ifh

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.0vj9k75egpkcaj32otckx81lyik0ur2l

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist8za4hw07eg5v5qk1x7blfl3lo8k4k7ri

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Ruleq5zs0ctjw07502mhf14vlg0imvrp0nvg

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.setganhhd6olompiuils4vyovvjsk122

    Questions to consider…i0ac3xh8yiqd5s5x3zu1veyfpu0d987h

    • Can we get our data out?h402hp6txpin96fijy9aj9pz83ci4f3b
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?m3r7k6x5b3i14vzwzobpa38r6iqoyq4a
    • Is our data secure?nv5soxc69tjrtzylg1rxy0ctgzlbt9r7
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?bjq6vjp7kzqll9c57uvqq75xqgell68m

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolvedvvymltdmwjmeyfzycfijaioid3pthcm2

    Benefitssf7duegxtvomcdi5o00reu8nzfog9qrs Unresolveddlwuctutvjj6x2zx83ltu2pmlor9cuhg
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    ul5iqan117c0t7bca1r5tk7usu69350o
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards
    speq52clie5sf4lx80oehfgetljwhue0

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationshipsth1y6tibu0qii8404esmup464dm5kov3

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.xknc78rk2sms2j76sryw2v8cxe1f7s2u

    4. Your DATA is your digital power2u5w04m2ankb9h9zvkdq1o0jszav3lqw

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.0b3ze3pi6l5fhzorpkbtjz743j25k3aa

    5. The Cloud is in diapersx9wp5vegse78morbo42mzyjgda46rm2e

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.ldl237hfng4vycxgcew8h5gxbgr00c1c

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?nmuhbory6zi9krm43irmcj865i6ltnk6

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:h8fzy7t32us3d8ucdqax5wmbp6q8ac8h

    • Where do you have accounts online?n0wo297m0r75us3qznlgqnyb36sk0k3d
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?8ptk1tjwodzrk5wu9vukbq00eyfityes
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?5cdbp0p7i0wa34lz6qwl9gymgy1a7k12

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).gex2m086wvv1mi5y8pfcda1gn9dycxai

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.tqj31wny7tmqfp801foiwp5mvgskeoyx

    Resources1loexhullu20oo2r7fqxukaor2jeffc7

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?1nxaqilly6sos12smxxjwjw8nvcgkrhb

    until next time,
    misty
    eof9c02nazwlisqy5f4xsid347fzqfbu

    (original) View 中文 translation

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleading

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rule

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.

    Questions to consider…

    • Can we get our data out?
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?
    • Is our data secure?
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolved

    Benefits Unresolved
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationships

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.

    4. Your DATA is your digital power

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.

    5. The Cloud is in diapers

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:

    • Where do you have accounts online?
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.

    Resources

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?

    until next time,
    misty



    Social Media Toolkit Released by Greenliningvpdaeorc8trqz9g42uh0bcr3v6lqaqnvSocial Media Toolkit Released by Greenlining

    By misty on November 5, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.glhfdnyiptdz1l3piv38eg57bh4o5k8c

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?85uzzkzmtiaogmaa4iufeyt7lzynnihl

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.fqvfxmfiobg6qoxgnrnf8hcz57f4op5t

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.fku12dw4nj5tghf7uuy2a9ua0hodu730

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.fktgsf96le08y0njc6eyu3qc5y42axmg

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideas877qkvrhpl9053hu6joqkmrnst6i38a2

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.70beoa0u75e0o0vjvbk742vw37pl3uu0

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content5qxdj06u1rnnz2pejxnura6u0lkcbbx7

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.ckvyb94lr8jdqff3latk2erq45sr0cu3

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.nto0lombrc81m5t76tr8sudzoofv7grl

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.61ehs4hdjodqq7twkvmeydjp62itlpxi

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?u5cqkxsg7072ggry8w6q9qy0pz4gdfjy

    best,
    Misty
    pt29tu845k7bsgn0lq9y4snzo7bga24p

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!f08acvc9p3icv0ijbo2hyp9zxev3ergk

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideas

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?

    best,
    Misty

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!



    Preparing Your Computer for Translation Purposesfeya95kcjnf587hbwr0q1yec6ieu73hdPreparing Your Computer for Translation Purposes

    By JC Sanchez on September 12, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!t0td7k3aw3lg5s9ce50zvaapbah3p9z8

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.hbpcqed21ecku56vytm3r7pn0a4ntye1

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!j2h9gvo32y8xz2wj7x0y44hwdc2r4aye

    Language Packagesrsmuc0itu4rcjxxtpymvlv5azp30p1u7

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.4v74u12endwuugdl2xadjky14bvbjwrd

    Finding These Packagesmfgxnlqu7vd6g622cyf6sen4bsyz29pe

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. 03ywsy0q3xq6gjevn0eo25hcywat9d90If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.ca9dp88vudoyugl6ffygnoi4l7v8wv0z

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. amr9rtmbdurwd9l0yc9d0mhfznjb6xy7If you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.k5lnr78dorb4ahboaq4lz4h20gbvm1ox

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.56l1292jhzu9i4eslj6qdt30k76p78c2

    The Listle70xzqjblkdto9m9n9ui1wghljyfpwq

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:te2ld7mevfq1iq6uavli0jejto0gtdwc

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. eld30hes0saz5haxd1oxhemutxp2sd0wYou shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(0mb9u6g6i37omsohyh9lt289iwvxeid5

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell firstcf2sr9k62k6vrgcynxlb2ijeiud06x09

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.bdkpbnsyx2q8ziaf1tnnlb81pvwpicrj

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.f11gs037t3v8qmax2u1mn1un4y215rdb

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.y4y5xvtjfvk8fh6gjxumj2emngmk1i0p

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.z6x32jfsh8c95xxb3b95klk0kczimsrb

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!0c9toozzeijnli8gfdajkybsewem2dos

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!

    Language Packages

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.

    Finding These Packages

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. If you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.

    The List

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. You shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell first

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!



    Embarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution49lu4a41yglgqiqek13aaxr4j8hp4gbzEmbarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution

    By jessica on June 20, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.ewzupa20ew3bf7d2gg9m94pehzy36bga

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.n6o6rfxxo1fa9lk168wlec7lgppb2eqg

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)
    wzvjb4su0oaa4092wi233mpczyhk012n

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.7xf3hfpyp3u6wi98fc9harhvaqnwvpss

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.8s4jqpvu1n8hq6w01xvstjhgfvxm9v58

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.5rxbt3cwwl06e76ub3zhxdd84ajtg0jc

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.wnhxbp6r2msjf8e5r0at30ycz5t5qeic

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?sm9pxmnbx32qkroh17e17cc4nkxcfiwy

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.om1h0jmvajcf7rfsbv0qan8vtgi04m9i

    An RFP represents:k3talx3xn0m4u975l1mfehm5hvl7bqnm

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.rrifteuewavio5z2h6cbvq46pur0bqtt
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.y6e14ynhf9954smexi9xtofw4zvi43ks
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.mmbowig3gq593esqvco2a5q3jmy1wgb9

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.o2evlq2w5phx4phb8ly8utu32ebdnfe2

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:fv375eftybcxh4ouyv3q0kuuknk4kjoq

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.9lzjxnbhv1k5wzgs6qmxwzmhj40ph7pg

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.n29tijs18zuu1z73xe74zazq70ld5s2j

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:o9ljnov959k8h21r9ya1079j1l004e1i

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.ui5xb335ry8zildgd85ryaby457ey6bi
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.l04ta6wfsey78so12t3zmsh0w71w3eie
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.xnmd4ht6d7s1z0ep21hc0uorijhv6avt

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.0yzs2titubk2w3ng6qyu99y9mvyfizg9

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?au2wlyco0vcfyowqn697fw2e0r9ttxgt

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?twju9mff2qlyol53p15qyw8rx6mrd66w

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?s48ln7hvcyxm1rwtj0vxa586sjujv9xd

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.

    An RFP represents:

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?



    Crash Course in Online Activismstelj4v13agylmqfodrnmc4xukahx8jgCrash Course in Online Activism

    By misty on April 26, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?tx4igtataspzfktdt9em0huwconescmb

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!s1dqclhw9hj92hmg99ue6dmyxg02ok17

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?q5hqozdl1w1tmxb7oupfydmkplp3xoyd, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.2hhmj7wz7te1drbikeo5unyeuj7awalp

    What is e-Advocacy?q5hqozdl1w1tmxb7oupfydmkplp3xoyd

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hubkyqak01mvn8c8qrph8jxzgb6uduis082

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!be5b6n7dpdn5y0j68e17vmrvubuep47r

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. pp6tf57nyl7x75fvgi9htuk7nz44uxe9Check out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/un9u3cfjo5cdztkbbh9e4uq8uuuo63lr

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.n6svfbzeyf5sirbcxpvbc064l2dznk21

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!o89t20350bxb8p37j3svdic01h9gqut5

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.

    What is e-Advocacy?

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hub

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. Check out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!



    Pain, Passion, Fame, and Fun6jzyhohxby1tuvyghddcts6nt8wq5tp1Pain, Passion, Fame, and Fun

    By misty on January 2, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?ovejagv4zccpjugka8no70hh0brjuht9

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.7c08zpjyotovl665ohwu9olhk44wmixj

    Of course, this is easier said than done.rs3fof6sds11nher19o0scph4ezrd0hu

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.2x20ip20ykcdd63e0y1c6vvp6pdpeub7

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.cbnl1ued4mmrf9vpgwdpvihdllp3p9br

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:8tywmrvxi3wyk9m19khfzvv5ritawepv

    Pain9veu9xz6jg5hapwetyvgzdj06xnqznyz Pain9veu9xz6jg5hapwetyvgzdj06xnqznyz is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passionoe5l002zyr7p65el6jeom746rrmer1k6 Passionoe5l002zyr7p65el6jeom746rrmer1k6 drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Famew4bpv5f89xq48igwo21k3g9lx456dbzz Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.amlzg2vrmdzsdhp7fqm9o95u2iqtjwbj
    Funuo2gm80j6rru4yh3i41b8tu9igmtnq37 Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.v81w9fls84jdcwqgl1gcqt05fvza8iut

    PAINmn40a1x5eobqeyzqjgrofy3auqsnifbu


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?xr3k4cudhymkno7f1o41bhajw27mk9n8

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.pooony685ifx68y70mgwznw6by0ivpoa

    PASSIONakydk9cbh1nbty98ugka8fr2ty16k8yl


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.b9aloex0vbupq12e6i4oqt0vnifsitek

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Famew4bpv5f89xq48igwo21k3g9lx456dbzz

    FAMEqitubwy60g86hr75gux4cw8timy7zadf


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?c7bibs5wm5ltqqwmvw993yxwqbe4zpr2

      Use Famew4bpv5f89xq48igwo21k3g9lx456dbzz to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.2fg4px1mft4qblfwdyeok73uepzwm06e
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.sxxho0txyrugjaqh1iuw8prvoqaeqpd9
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.1xdc635pzqk6shk1qlbnx7gxys4feg15

    FUN4gis1c97on7x3uwctlld5ddqcxoqy9it


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.nmdinzcxlxfuixq04n5sn950oz3cwdga

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.e8q4304mha2xx9ld0v8dtmvgcnygdvsh

    Value Delivery is Keyhrvkzr9n688o9ng64d0m1btrrs0ag7an

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.l64rekfq0rykwv97g7nia37nrs1h5qkh

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.m8lq19jhkmq3nu1l2m2jb5ekp8fh9kum

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.xhhjthfn0uys2osjshlq615po6dk6pcu

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?jeqqrsl8cd767x3kntq5fcjmp7x9wq56

    We’d love to hear more ideas!75s4xpbny2dfqyx9rm3dey31aam6r0zp

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.

    Of course, this is easier said than done.

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:

    Pain Pain is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passion Passion drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Fame Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.
    Fun Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.

    PAIN


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.

    PASSION


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Fame…

    FAME


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?

      Use Fame to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.

    FUN


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.

    Value Delivery is Key

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?

    We’d love to hear more ideas!



    Making a ‘Tweet This’ Button with # and @

    By jessica on September 5, 2012
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?1r17ntgdyhz3k6xtspxflk4fzcxqtmyl

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.
    yx57uu048php490swwlj8s9hzbf0ycrn

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:87d1wjdj1cbpz6pb4p9ie2aqz27reg2c

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?
    rf1o359m3sn02z04pgzc3yvjdn9cx7gf

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. ynosybmcwf6f5bje7hm8lp0giib31gcpAlso, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.xvvjcv6sonz3hzs30ytfeficcc0di0k5

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #xf4c5fu9r5gxm7h3szy8naqw1u41jv07&%@j5k84h51err1b1spkoptqca3u39yuqs3 tweet?zcy8jls4v3t9ish6d6k2x24bvmupqh3f

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.31ge1hiczuofaro598x8pnux4dc59fk3

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:hecf6x0ghd0qpmv7tqd2a3madleol77t

    • lettersog5bxgszvrcrdv3uh8y2rg1fpxju9won
    • numbers02mv8qpqg1nl43bizgbe5iqns8yasq0j
    • special characters that have meaning in the URL68siypy67ceggz2ed3js3pp6zomkspnp

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.izoc9xuvn15ovcvd3gkhznhcz52o8e6g

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spaceyuwm9n5osgnoitpjdi1zif0vj3be67nvs, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newslettersog5bxgszvrcrdv3uh8y2rg1fpxju9won. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.dkq3rgefesaoocamgx7zetr2k8uzi82l

    Share on Twitter Links that include #xf4c5fu9r5gxm7h3szy8naqw1u41jv07 and @j5k84h51err1b1spkoptqca3u39yuqs3e4q2w506g6j7eakzjum1fcyy057g30c8

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.n4ofepsgzmrg5zvkpfk93cmis61gqq04

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #xf4c5fu9r5gxm7h3szy8naqw1u41jv07">#xf4c5fu9r5gxm7h3szy8naqw1u41jv07Hashtag symbol and the #xf4c5fu9r5gxm7h3szy8naqw1u41jv07functionality">@j5k84h51err1b1spkoptqca3u39yuqs3Mention symbol.rx2cckzmgqky2lltulk9caxix1j0my33

    Common Characters for a Tweet:3kje6cwu11dsbathutflqt38huggnbxg
    URL Encoding978kwtntab4onplw9ynz613apbm9oa3n Character2g3voj1hq0dd31dtgb661fuwn9ktjx2c Descriptione7y7ysfn68431w6spp7eyd53n9jyhm5m
    %20pxu1r1tu4fvtgry9flq4uafq5p0jws6c spaceyuwm9n5osgnoitpjdi1zif0vj3be67nv a spaceyuwm9n5osgnoitpjdi1zif0vj3be67nv between words in a tweet
    %23rsypyzlaid72sbp7ecqdpk9wuezr2xwj #xf4c5fu9r5gxm7h3szy8naqw1u41jv07 hashtag to categorize tweeterpc0gcmdrpynzrluka9yvtostuec7wg
    %40xuoa64gwg5y0vyjgxh7bhwhkq88wyiom @j5k84h51err1b1spkoptqca3u39yuqs3 at sign to mention another twitter user2l5xt7av3ql7ddhswxyz9hvkvv3b28uv

    Let’s take a look:gkf7emrfy7vw0d8m6lk6vt9c1a6z9upg

    To make a link that works, just replace spaceyuwm9n5osgnoitpjdi1zif0vj3be67nvs and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    That sends the user to this:1h1cq855eigo2dsyrrzyr4te7w07097s

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:pnpzy6v35s71w91unvpb7b9eeb5gzpbf

    • Blue is the HTML codenipgdwingfjvwe8gzwunq4b66yv89dvn6x4vwwd04k33c0vdl7gd23fwd8p7cdc8
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a linky9lsomebe4s3c8ixpavv412bnfbt61vu0k4xq7srpdeflql1lfcqfnmnzk4owpom
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters7qj557p3fkhs2wthdub2a1qufxmssqjpo7akgnj8ynntf4dg02klwd4ooitgepct
    • Red is the text of the tweetgri04a0vgi7ja44kjfrtg1ed7ygtfg8lvdy86msp8gx7sjovx7bhvlmpwzzrf700
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet1596136gs1fexuflwre66c9s8gzznziegsqwkxy91y5ke9geajfc3dzleh0y579b
    • Black is what the link will sayaj38d6cfz6esu4qc0fy2ha89dfgj1ds1

    Make a Buttonijj3c8480mli2t1f6iwsnsws5ya1olgx

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.tvsn3xztbpsk6sv5m02u0krbi2r8x1ng

    Use code like this:17c1x1tzhs8ugazpcpcmz7inklundm95

    • Blue is the HTML codenipgdwingfjvwe8gzwunq4b66yv89dvn6x4vwwd04k33c0vdl7gd23fwd8p7cdc8
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a linky9lsomebe4s3c8ixpavv412bnfbt61vu0k4xq7srpdeflql1lfcqfnmnzk4owpom
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters7qj557p3fkhs2wthdub2a1qufxmssqjpo7akgnj8ynntf4dg02klwd4ooitgepct
    • Red is the text of the tweetgri04a0vgi7ja44kjfrtg1ed7ygtfg8lvdy86msp8gx7sjovx7bhvlmpwzzrf700
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet1596136gs1fexuflwre66c9s8gzznziegsqwkxy91y5ke9geajfc3dzleh0y579b
    • Aqua is the image links58jj5z8tz5mn1q53ucwuuxtihtzs76a
    • Black is what the link will sayaj38d6cfz6esu4qc0fy2ha89dfgj1ds1 if pictures are not loaded

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?uslpaoauz44n3bvjmtkf8v46gw7y8p1s

     gh3vaki1kchtcskiice2zyus6l7e85yf

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. Also, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #&%@ tweet?

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:

    • letters
    • numbers
    • special characters that have meaning in the URL

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spaces, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newsletters. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.

    Share on Twitter Links that include # and @

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #Hashtag symbol and the @Mention symbol.

    Common Characters for a Tweet:
    URL Encoding Character Description
    %20 space a space between words in a tweet
    %23 # hashtag to categorize tweet
    %40 @ at sign to mention another twitter user

    Let’s take a look:

    To make a link that works, just replace spaces and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    For a link like this: Share This on Twitter

    That sends the user to this:

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Black is what the link will say

    Make a Button

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.

    For a button like this: Tweet This

    Use code like this:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Aqua is the image link
    • Black is what the link will say if pictures are not loaded

    If you found this post useful, go ahead and Tweet about it!

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?

     



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