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The Cycle of Listening, Part II7tsi32pxx95vajj4vxhp9ixm60swcu1aThe Cycle of Listening, Part II

By jessica on February 25, 2014
(English → 中文) View original
Translators:

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.z3l70fvw86nx7y4q3yt6u3nokxvimocb

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.kwzmga127byx4jdz8mt6lixo6rv1hefs

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.182mbakxufoh6c5hr858emhyx9mysquk

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.5fjatoanf41metbxnazv5oo1my3dt58o

The Right Tool for the Jobet4vtb4hlothyukql7rqbaroiuv821q7

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. fantzpddcjl3y2egtmxuoy7956vl3h59It’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.gum94vh5eeuno05tw0uvpzdnk392orwv

We have left out analytic tools like Facebookkzfpxjhgsmppug35q3lf10kh67y2opgy Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.is7zbl3y3doaqbvw993j84h4lvleeqyn

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.7cid34w0hrite332yr7k80w9yp93lygj

Online Listening Toolsbndajg2ngdatboba2g62yeo911qngoih

Listening Dashboardsk1ye23w0mw36v8k30dgfmjrwff1iq300

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.bxjz278usgvjwsbdzbssaodjubbw0i02

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.idg4dr1gbxrodfhqfnpxrnoqryxwtda1
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
    r55yffwd42mo7coqnfcfgfohrp759z3q
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.vunmxbm27rgtgsu71yo26zdlhenkrwhd
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feedrtxeiq2428q03a30a4s8sa9u4bqqficx

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.ot7735koyoi88tvvkawywnn4b8cynm81

<span class=New Content Feedrtxeiq2428q03a30a4s8sa9u4bqqficxs" title="New Content Feedrtxeiq2428q03a30a4s8sa9u4bqqficxs" style="PADDING-TOP: 15px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px;"/>
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.xpasm9wj38tksdmnj8ptkrr974mtfj82
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.456fxb6m4p678hrhy1mgjq2g4rqtpezj
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.pfkuv5d9ltzq520q38ly95cyqlpv2l2i
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.4bzdzmvw3vbkmgpanrkaw4nc0vsyfys9

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.sy50pk4du5lxguh7jwanucmc8ty8fexy

Twitter Listening9spik35qzrbhz5r6kz4pny7mga6lq8tp

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.fkrfq0d53gipi6ld7azy3jrj2eej3j58

  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.6kprql6f4eqx8vwgvdfnrjflte7078a3
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.p8kiu8941pxc6yq3pfh2sx6voh4nnu92
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.8ex8gvctyh4qljkrizkzbugo0kj9mgpk
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.rkag2ix0drt5jmexu04dbq7hbmfv2jnj
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.a9n665i7aji1yppknko9c4h9n7cz0ml0
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.5us7qzfpiw8lac0onvfbfaff68g91i4w

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.blulwwnl3kecsdcurnrjvdyursmncrxe

Facebookkzfpxjhgsmppug35q3lf10kh67y2opgy

  • Facebookkzfpxjhgsmppug35q3lf10kh67y2opgy – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebookkzfpxjhgsmppug35q3lf10kh67y2opgy, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebookkzfpxjhgsmppug35q3lf10kh67y2opgy may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Togetherk0dxe7liu0n5btqbk9hvwiek99l2fosq

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.36p60co8rbckqx2yebjsxxodlui6w9rp

    Remember:1l5xcbo1qbigycw86k0o7eb17ysojwtb

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identifiedxpbyv6m0gop1azpcovart3a7a0e03twr
  2. Identify opportunities8jkkmdzmate4xhklmxgupena5nfqdbmc
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?et4gtap0vz3ug0vrq6t2myp687l5p2xu
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?7nv1kz2m6lrf2hq07pzn0rk9lbldhjne
    • What vocabulary are people using?0z44s6w8zpfh6y28mpn7diwrxw11pybf
    • How does it differ?r03ha980inopfovbbb3f1ilb8ye2v70c
    • Who is talking about your issue?f59407zhrfx39k5p8gtbzqjcywjcc65i
    • Who is connecting with you?mbxrp6pyiqoylgx44k1oyyjvnupmu5a7
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?ndwqvubpklfhteoh7hx7hg7r2823fx1t
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategyt1kdlt26bepd6tzfm463gppssprxyfpi
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:s8rmzwm43lh1iyp4f2u99xonmjynegex

    • Connect with influencersct8k5kqdnz9l9fyi1h9baydk2zun19o3
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of courseqaivqhpf0fjadf7bsndzva9b8dfbpvj5
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.h63yql1a6gbmfzy4qkoc1xugm98pzri6
  4. Keep listening to see how it is workingi9kfws5jqbl55f8htykdkx0c16lnk1rs
  5. Practice and improvepsut5sx23peosox4zgnd1awyvh8t7qqm

Special Thanksvyigd961dho1n270e3vrziezkfw37pdt

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.m87axf0y5mi1zzwimviqn9dpknnc4tnh

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!j3mb1vik5ocuxdl25vh29772uepdzmu8

(original) View 中文 translation

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.

The Right Tool for the Job

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. It’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.

We have left out analytic tools like Facebook Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.

Online Listening Tools

Listening Dashboards

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.

New Content Feeds
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.

Twitter Listening

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.

Twitter Listening Tools
  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.

Facebook

  • Facebook – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebook, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebook may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Together

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.

    Remember:

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identified
  2. Identify opportunities
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?
    • What vocabulary are people using?
    • How does it differ?
    • Who is talking about your issue?
    • Who is connecting with you?
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategy
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:

    • Connect with influencers
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of course
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.
  4. Keep listening to see how it is working
  5. Practice and improve

Special Thanks

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!



The Listening Cycle, Part I0o82are6uzp3hc1v58fr623soi4kkdiaThe Listening Cycle, Part I

By jessica on February 14, 2014
(English → 中文) View original
Translators:

Beyonce wants you to listeng7k651rskyy6m75uja7875r61enmg44n

Beyonce says Listen

Image source:youtube.com7ot46hmo0xqv8842z8hepau05xwhdkra

The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.ar7yc90ojp5sohzfiqgszgxdyervm9dm

Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. p9u8xys0om8zhinue6hydanpu2s2lp90However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.l8k9h0d5lzy4le0tjihmt4vj31191r0d

We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.a7kefxj9o625llch2gy4uag3wpam9kp9

This blog post will teach you how to:bhv80u3co9ib9kxtehascpwq9qsafj6g
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.bc3wumqbmfjxlockfbbd8mi6uwuay09z
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.fg05jfjaev7i2swebu9y756kg1it3888
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.9g6aekg2uowe5mroc8mtlywcr1y1nc7m
  • How to get started:u6638k0ezursd1fyodd6s13w4an0sdfd

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. qg0ttvq87aj5j0sipjy01mhz4zgfap3qOnce you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.vjod37pzt1ddmh0d037q14nniy5w43zp

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.d7eqw1qb7kumhg5063myyc3j0047rcsu

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.mhjafw7ak35ksrzo9joeg4yvmc2yyxya

    Keywords to listen to may include:cinykoaildmq3mtf528kcr257bvsql6t
    Organization(s) involvedm300oltn8kkx1n00rp0rvb96iu8sq2z3 Spokespeople for or against the issuenwyg6sv7vivk9ojbnheebj2k2dejt6a6
    Executive Director or CEO08kst91ic08b1r06b1k44n4aq72gpnag Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you supportsqpv5fdmmmz3vb7nfztwvhony1v50sgj
    Key leader(s) of the campaign6ljmqizbn2rdr1hcb45n9fsjrs1o2zgy Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part ofynwoby0xsao2pl6fgsevtg02luw6lyr9
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.12k3pw9l6puwtp3mnsfpd97koe3d2fwt

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.bn6r0cjm2nvgco1rsogpl4w8enhl2wl3

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.rbx8h4q9mgtjgi3t4eaal59ovyk1lx72

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.arx5niy6vb25ypejutgezap8hb2w3u43

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.el3bkakn5smm17o0gx9ubpmveg5h0vl5

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.lohpy6qpme508j1yqiu8c8bb4afz2gye

    Testing… testingfwi5s2za8ma6rrxovk5vvbcun1tzlr0r

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.sz3xb2ibivx61acf7jrvahm29319dkvw

    Let’s walk through an examplef6knsxbkewk6rwcx925ucp9o7oql0005

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker”m1q5x3r5jaw4mon4w9wtu6qbrdpa24hf and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”dipdlh1jrmtcufz0my0x6ypspvenq2et. Neutralcd2wd5fusgmbtkz8zweksi5f1b5ezzh1 parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”dipdlh1jrmtcufz0my0x6ypspvenq2et, interchangeably.bjtofkfpv9eqcayowik9tfohgos19ypa

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.uvr5x90908qe2czibbhwao0e2aiuw4kg
     j2j5lnflahmxbloam0dqqfyl5u0ftam3 Alliesm9b2yg11cp1rfu0q80xja42e9lm880rk Neutralcd2wd5fusgmbtkz8zweksi5f1b5ezzh1 Opponentsva5q0bp81jznb5te43qvwy3eysv0yxwj
    Search Termshtzwq5dkz56gqe13mxs6pxe0aqe055cd “sex worker”m1q5x3r5jaw4mon4w9wtu6qbrdpa24hf Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”dipdlh1jrmtcufz0my0x6ypspvenq2et
    1vakbj0q4xj14b4692q5fe6gjht6w9po
    “prostitute”dipdlh1jrmtcufz0my0x6ypspvenq2et

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.83pv3n763svs2t1eb21ex5c4w0tgsu5q

      What I can learn from listening:a2mwirwa6rmhs11v6x53hgpolnbm4fk5

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickrlqovph1l84z4kbn7q307002t7gt51xcd

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.o6e7fvjb33pqo0xji01s6af5tzkvviw9
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?e9l7y39ku3iciaufuykwdbrb83pveuvi
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”dipdlh1jrmtcufz0my0x6ypspvenq2et? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker”m1q5x3r5jaw4mon4w9wtu6qbrdpa24hf and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker”m1q5x3r5jaw4mon4w9wtu6qbrdpa24hf but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute”dipdlh1jrmtcufz0my0x6ypspvenq2et without “sex worker”m1q5x3r5jaw4mon4w9wtu6qbrdpa24hf the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.n7veqeghedgbn38e21gbfgtlluyal2vy

    Who? What? Now, Where?4gfeqaaa258bnpm5g1gavb8e40vezacu

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.ys83wrnahklht1wtr5vxvmlipvnphzo5

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickrzh8zeocybixpbtzhsginoh62zuyuzr6p

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:qnhhpy2z6loqxlt2rvzne7yfpel409sg

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?4q28qy41yub8pm8tmcm5cw96bhvxsl7m
    • Are they a Facebook user?g7m67uebyzerqrukfzv6x7m56jel8i3f
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?1q6vk95epthhi0bjvnkvheej5qmf3sxu

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.rcgpggj75klieqbj5j2fh90kwhn2usnc

    • Where do they get their news and information from?dgmjcti1dg2lh5tvwc8zcgsms1nxdjbg
    • Whose information are they sharing?nomwmpogtzr583hsled0qi5pokuvkahx
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?0gk7bcvcefiqfrtptni2uf84a5hilkrc

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.1xk4h8m85sacgy5x1kop82opw0hdmz6d

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.9jcheg01l1veu64xty688grpn800dzwd

    Where from here?yb9e2n07zpv419v721yygj4pz2nyi3r7

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.8pp65c5g0x041l0jehhjsvw3txc647b3

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.fd8upddcbcp6f1owia34gayh82e40uq5

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?faiv8ifzp0pzmpl2l7u2u1nlu820qmjv

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Beyonce wants you to listen

    Beyonce says Listen

    Image source:youtube.com

    The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

    Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.

    We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.

    This blog post will teach you how to:
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.
  • How to get started:

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. Once you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.

    Keywords to listen to may include:
    Organization(s) involved Spokespeople for or against the issue
    Executive Director or CEO Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you support
    Key leader(s) of the campaign Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.

    Testing… testing

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.

    Let’s walk through an example

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker” and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”. Neutral parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”, interchangeably.

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.
      Allies Neutral Opponents
    Search Terms “sex worker” Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”
    “prostitute”

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.

      What I can learn from listening:

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickr

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker” and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker” but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute” without “sex worker” the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.

    Who? What? Now, Where?

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickr

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?
    • Are they a Facebook user?
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.

    • Where do they get their news and information from?
    • Whose information are they sharing?
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.

    Where from here?

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?



    Text Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizingi0t5ci5qyuyfg2wnc5kd41m6ff3e1aeaText Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizing

    By Jordan Ramos on January 30, 2014
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.n08esjk29n5fec8iwfwbxmhone5dvuj9



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?ewbzt5wffogryeysuv653rkb0axqnq1s

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.ibkoqg2ir7o5kmrbp7tju2yq1sgfvrt3

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. ouv2zzuj53zoqehgw7wktxuud3l31gagBecause it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.7wcim5gspgr7yuqtgla2tx0qaigk3p01

    Just a few use-cases:eynww68b3u374mzy5lvlasxdlb4qafhf

         Harassment reporting and map09itu0fg2zvq1p77arvl1q7vqoma55lw

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, educationuw0e6sc7nro2afxdah8yxrw4a0187ixr

         Mobile Clinic communicationsq9eea8ctnbjeqa4fb07r0p7ykrlsjs30

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in needkwez41r2qmcqziu3b834f9eqn30rloyw

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in Indiarx6udji3lhnq48k7zp5lvlstgv4w8tdp



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Think85d39m21v7yfgwsxa6uspua8b8vo7dm5

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:pd1cn64hnw9lt2j444jzila3o23xofu3
    1. Intimate/Directgrmy6sybtg2ycmax2kuuo8d82gvtgccn

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.zq8ndjlnixenwyz0xt30qdz8m8q6qcfg

    1. Immediatelf8bvfbcmmqa5w6htcxnhxobufo3p9b1

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.25w2rhdawu1gz2w6mbmuso676swcos1h

    1. Always on, Everywhereg46uuduu9sb5m25iey70dz1yu6z0udv1

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.n6h8le4w5o56rtdnkyajuug3nhm612ce

    1. Accessiblej5ri6t3y0mfvwb4hc4e8y6cccw7vpo8z

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.g051t92ki696c6bivnvj1m5p35re1ye7




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operationlr4uilw59zx0ncrb3ugi8gewgik5qjm1

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).kzb3wogljoqph0hjesnpj7eacdbfplvz

    So, what can you do, then?31ajju2d31i88y9ehpjq2pkors6ead43

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:mmrip1n45xr9gw0rk3yrl8r26pjdd5dq

    • Send/receive messageslgb0jkohaj0t0pbr4patectuxpas70si
    • Manage contacts and groups of contacts6u3ogdu242q74fmazjx6n5o9g7byw12t
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messagesno57bvdg9ohr58eain98yr9jo62uqvg3

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:yf10l49m7w8g336q8jagu6j6onjgnjic

    • What is required to run it,kca7iffpjfgcqtzrldxb2ye36514c29m
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),8zyuqd6oa777k8960i57joe4vl8fvkxu
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,pbjulw7jxtyr3i1ojmh9cbye4lhbpwc4
    • Set-up (time and energy), andtqs1i7vm9uon8rcpwymm23ta430ief4x
    • Scale.en27fi173ewjd0n89ar1tepp5lj7mhwr

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.ks8umgsobo5w6wx5nxhe9468cjpzmx1x



    Use Responsiblyo7zj1rf8npdst4p5i939ze1mc1qobytq

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:lldko7xvnrpmr0xpks2l4dui5ba86s0h
    1. Consent4ncitej4p4z5ig6357h45e0w28o79kr4

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. oe6plqq36sglo0941nyk6bh3c8ybbghqThis way they won’t feel trapped!xwn2lajv7q6teolo88waub5mm9sbg653

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequencydpp2ft29ucevxzv69uqc5fpevq17ri1v

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.z13iwo9ety7evlmxejqdwd0fzl1s59ov

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!cxt1s1q9ognh81q1fgbzt61vsmwzii4k

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.ilho0ihqx8eckfhxbkic9v0cz2j8zyq8

    1. Privacytbvis8uwvf52i9rwjg115ssigi0te49y

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.yfzwtol648kvklwk8u9uehxqa3g5kri9

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.iv2m0w8ibpeime3n3l0ixnipudaht8k1

    Getting Startedeuce3t716n67reuhurm61geghrv5hufl

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:h9mki4vmzoe3v5n07392r9rv0swu7v8f
    • Who is my audience? How large?jclj6bhwk2o54lxet0omtagsyqacc60l
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?z5510bi9oowone7du3053wi2op1qmiec
    • What do I need the service to do?yzp1vcjnban8oo0dvpb7w0ltx6r4gua4
    • What do different services require or cost?9qlvn3xbrieg41sb33dxafdhw5q7v1bu
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?lgg7fbtzppm5kvkstye46u54dmos96ul
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?1a07sucvubdplod9d286zg8f4lfplj9d

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    vje0k3qja0meijnqlxqvduzk32waipa3

    Resources1ayf90yge7b5kkhf88m4uykipol7vzmm

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]7y42zg6e5z2idy8t4ubzrn0ivl8gcx89

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacylxwc2voyigcqjy05wjg7wifa2iuo224d

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.
    jrvkdjaephip0nxsas6613t5v19k4ude

    (original) View 中文 translation
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. Because it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.

    Just a few use-cases:

         Harassment reporting and map

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, education

         Mobile Clinic communications

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in need

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in India



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Think

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:
    1. Intimate/Direct

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.

    1. Immediate

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.

    1. Always on, Everywhere

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.

    1. Accessible

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operation

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).

    So, what can you do, then?

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:

    • Send/receive messages
    • Manage contacts and groups of contacts
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messages

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:

    • What is required to run it,
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,
    • Set-up (time and energy), and
    • Scale.

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.



    Use Responsibly

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:
    1. Consent

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. This way they won’t feel trapped!

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequency

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.

    1. Privacy

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.

    Getting Started

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:
    • Who is my audience? How large?
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?
    • What do I need the service to do?
    • What do different services require or cost?
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    Resources

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacy

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.



    Trust in the Cloudx4nao6box2e8w18vb905ti931nk6rr3eTrust in the Cloud

    By misty on December 4, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?znbpdt9advdmp4avl5ahytr954dw97oz

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)0t6x0gchbn205pljepceh811zpa1qtmg

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleadingol8uov2ewurro9xq1h84fb3zkshyl3yz

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.uus8vsaajkyh7srxor3dwene6vodgvs1

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.3c9lud33ji67xh2zucj31ebxyeiv3lgw

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.ep06l2yoc3us1ye7svpnwo5htzhkb1nf

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklistcmyfe1ghc40prwrzk4627nbng49lz6q2

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rulety0grkhdzr99t62hm8jmjawypmiibj6v

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.z82ufz7slxghuqw69jwvhdgdb7pf6chv

    Questions to consider…kq7stqbssv38n38zt06470eopcr8qng0

    • Can we get our data out?b8onsb42bbbgwa12ilmcdj2pzvlqdd4e
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?9omwmamvbczdmqecsulr6i7emid9jj8j
    • Is our data secure?cprcz1rw0snmflrnvuv0w65715gl4d77
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?iytr6gzsmhuvynlui4r8u9q4m9n0zni7

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolved1n6zslkh19j9e8fit6t5v5hfgt1mfqg6

    Benefitspeqvyisw5y80frr7ggovcrjcje91ria7 Unresolvedbfvturxwuwwrqnm0jgymkxzoykbdudsv
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    u3q1geimr6l66qxnu0i13tryam8gsypc
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards
    7oe3i9ylz1t8zd9rutrl6ipmc6crbc99

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationships8cqbme1sebimxg2fnvthowgw588v9xo8

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.r1l1814hb3pjujekgxew7s8pzs5z7jnp

    4. Your DATA is your digital powerspgrcop68vwfanq8szgaqp00tdk4om37

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.85ei55pzqw2ci2kik8f7j5noxit4t96s

    5. The Cloud is in diapersc6jgjwu0fuqlbyfbn87g9ulhunwgem5g

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.duwon1w7c4xzr1rzgr9us8ca67aku73y

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?1zkbdi56lw6d3fidvwh88futv5gucoq4

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:5ay9uccb2jzej1r4z3z9zv4bi1hxqxum

    • Where do you have accounts online?bgmejb3asb89vx11w87mx3lcpy46qdzr
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?f9it05axrf1stjss1f7n6jeubc5rlm3r
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?4wogpm1e07an5xjpx2wim8uc0rsjl2pf

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).cwntp7coj5zddmcrlmc7aq0was4i7ava

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.qitdr2ao9j7x7rod3glswxzkdu8cr7y8

    Resourceshi9qq43yazxnfyhgajjikf5lnvkcex4l

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?nc51ik49kurum7tt7jm6p22lt0g9vwx9

    until next time,
    misty
    jtwblg3txs109p2mhppdavxtgdie1grb

    (original) View 中文 translation

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleading

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rule

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.

    Questions to consider…

    • Can we get our data out?
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?
    • Is our data secure?
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolved

    Benefits Unresolved
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationships

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.

    4. Your DATA is your digital power

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.

    5. The Cloud is in diapers

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:

    • Where do you have accounts online?
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.

    Resources

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?

    until next time,
    misty



    Social Media Toolkit Released by Greenliningkp7501adh9aqmnrac3bics64ca4kqdo0Social Media Toolkit Released by Greenlining

    By misty on November 5, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.2j6u4rd09br8d42lpoozpq5yfzm7jwtc

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?99ac7g2azcn1fzt761r99aowoa36kd8k

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.te5zzhvvmg3juryl7zyr4tu8l6y40v2j

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.7so70p0ijok7ctfng8ifirzwtdx7xubv

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.zd1r3mim6wzfac48kermja6w4dsoxtmm

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideasxjfbip8qw1ahg749ivopj6wmcqlafim2

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.zv9pj8jjko6av59mfzgzhanmiq17qjcg

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content1rlu5rtfbvpfsznx9uolskzz3a8gpwsg

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.o390kkxx3dqed0fxehz15zfm1gc24yrj

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.xj5j66k6xln62sod5mhbindshvtxj176

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.nitpos15eyebn7rrgq5gdsapnfq9px63

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?y1zid0a1v8lx7h3uw7w06mhe2xd0d3g2

    best,
    Misty
    zvy15401ltkogzwstobq21xr0jm21i9r

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!1l7ge4b2ndy2lx4hkap5gg71v326duu4

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideas

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?

    best,
    Misty

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!



    Preparing Your Computer for Translation Purposesg7buyk1sumt04u1kzp01aak6976w1598Preparing Your Computer for Translation Purposes

    By JC Sanchez on September 12, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!hnoysnbvujmb1lzbo2kbdx5cswgcv882

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.7h2c31far3ekhlzgjjqj406p15gql4ti

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!e756yuelm5ufiu5eeqrwf96p9l5igu3l

    Language Packageszzr364iewo2ttsr5s4k9l6s1uw1n21os

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.00yeubacfhcrwzbcik67bu8snv0z70qx

    Finding These Packagesehpox7qe9xmf1ykn97sde53ja924vlkz

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. gq1u71xd822v705oo69ty2j828dqwza3If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.xgqll3hbisvkkoewzmyisbj4xl3hw10j

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. ywutsum4p97q3zlhcwpoth5mzdyd51ltIf you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.xqwbmu5icvy9m9wgdhjp4k7v7c6qydhl

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.jxez4qvpy3bfvq2xsjddd5fhfk5ogawq

    The Listplk4cpm6pv2spnuu6olqtcwi50tgg91w

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:951kzv8xrqtbgll7r2iruv2ekx6f1jr0

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. pz1tt2ueg9ibg90uotq9hzh9dzkt4ujkYou shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(ydlet6o8msa6zb9nm91454kwrud7fri3

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell firstxlanqrqow0lvuzivxqqbhdlsn74hebr1

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.dxv5ks9k14bwdraczbjuagn1v6uup5ns

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.9enxn6qme2lm09j6qh51eajb1lf1wrjv

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.nhshpj6l4fb6cfvsqbfmhzih35jcxo3b

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.onnpbora07029hof1uz0iv89x7ygv9j9

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!skwvqzxduq8gw8zge73v864ox7h5lab3

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!

    Language Packages

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.

    Finding These Packages

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. If you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.

    The List

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. You shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell first

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!



    Embarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution2mw1vjtd5h13dm8afzliec109fph5t2xEmbarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution

    By jessica on June 20, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.h5nxl2jrmx3j8vwlk06d5zgorz3f5pld

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.kkbcgibfiu9vtharr077pan5u194n57x

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)
    iaxsbqhfug0zm1n3fmsuu0hlrfmvvn94

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.fhqq02n9nyr99892ncy2mw1unwa1rvxw

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.53ir6691go9r53uskx0ku4ocy13wo4tk

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.la2dnf90k0offpmhs3mq6hrwjslzngmz

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.qowwljek5hrq3pmff9fiwy8rp4ol9ksp

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?vsunvd75atkkty20m9hbptmkqjs819dn

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.rytlhqhj6bf1aavreafbz1x9c430pud7

    An RFP represents:lvgdv92g2palm4l0avev7ut97pl7b1om

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.pip14kou0bklqx5hy40uddb6dcfojw1y
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.836isralk7u5hwev20fdfe03bston7bm
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.r55yffwd42mo7coqnfcfgfohrp759z3q

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.qdc7bigtwsxdk0wggej396ov42xxq2b6

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:p3iy72i8nh71wn4nru792wnqydmo5kil

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.l2aqazysifhqjnwh0htyopjhm97cuov5

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.7von9t5gh2ary94q56thfnui85pe8wz5

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:yrr99gzanl23isdilmlc3rxm4iz9hby6

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.hcq8x432phu5r9nepjjvmbmjlyesmm9u
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.53sm31tyb5iv9ahktbemkengn126yw2t
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.tucisy1uxcp4sbsry38u0ypd8m92ancu

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.c1o8wlm1c4wiqemfrmt81dz52on689tb

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?yggxbwamo6nwd5fymhy5rou3lppezamn

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?hmtnfjvulgcts994yj0jsk4dfs40fwkm

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?sy286qqxekidfqlcw26lougxsd3q6uro

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.

    An RFP represents:

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?



    Crash Course in Online Activismdkwpc7nzqe3fc8at4rjmzvzezkfr3jk6Crash Course in Online Activism

    By misty on April 26, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?ze8qenlys0onh1vz3syaul9rdjo08g8y

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!8hiiyq8nhm1bdg7qll4y75au94pjiweh

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?7m4yyt7kbesd5bnuk2v00nyuh5qit81r, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.6h82lsve1661q49i4vr6ryn3l7288eg4

    What is e-Advocacy?7m4yyt7kbesd5bnuk2v00nyuh5qit81r

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hubvo9an5o9b2zaqvmrhdqwn004xl66ib74

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!24lneulfefbv5dvrrv1hfz6wfsxp24tu

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. gqxz4xtum4bdkor1h5xh9dluat1d9igfCheck out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/skpzj0xvol9kpvx05k9ozsdyar1xjw21

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.k1xcv0nwes2e21hcet4iw428xiom12dc

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!pi76pw5856zayvnghq8ves60xdc01o3h

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.

    What is e-Advocacy?

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hub

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. Check out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!



    Pain, Passion, Fame, and Fun562b3ggeom27mdy0k76r7tu8dlvioebkPain, Passion, Fame, and Fun

    By misty on January 2, 2013
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?sq2tyyz8ecab4g1yfzxb1m2m8dl9530o

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.olgckwgueemmjaqzyhcm42cgy3m9hv6v

    Of course, this is easier said than done.seu9ir5hv0xnhegq3ocnv04glg4culrc

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.o98sn753dk9hy96s46bzzhfbd8ow6wgl

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.f5te5bhy1ljthbekk33bn30y93y9yax4

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:mpmsfu9zxzdumlnprm6u4yfl3x4x40fh

    Painiow2i8q1agn193e119sjprbuqb7lblaj Painiow2i8q1agn193e119sjprbuqb7lblaj is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passion5j8ymrjgsx73xnenquolzq98slk494m5 Passion5j8ymrjgsx73xnenquolzq98slk494m5 drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Famevrekzev6l37hihxxqwbzygfnfy3vcdiy Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.z65qw8k9y5yvnqqz39zv7sb2yzom3fct
    Fun23xxbipc96o9azjiy3m9ylohgz7tbym4 Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.6esuavwhqazs8ksr2alroigh2u6vo67l

    PAINsb2j7nk22bp6ct2sgmqofbcwlc8kxq0f


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?ggq6w4bjb3y16pc6c8yjdiaeaavtwo43

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.a730pd77rbprmkmnk4hr9g32srcftc6u

    PASSIONemdo4ovaluf5rtf6fhm409yza9w5keyo


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.2ajbu449c4o0377lc3c0yyxzh7jwjclc

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Famevrekzev6l37hihxxqwbzygfnfy3vcdiy

    FAMEswbo8b01av9jzf633ht1yu00qxkjsbba


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?e7ol7o76ri2ke1xu8otk79siuakm6kwa

      Use Famevrekzev6l37hihxxqwbzygfnfy3vcdiy to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.3ebp2tjeknlgzdg3ppxy5iyehn3vqask
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.cbetlfv98pvt1f7w55qbunjkwjw9j8am
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.a8ukeedkpq18qc2oxw7q44oqi5nr7vd7

    FUN1c7ouf5slkoto6x1b4tbszf56tieovqf


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.k1keg28z0uwqlrr6novptv7g0wfi4zof

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.bii9x5191tlgbgjrb9bxhdvhsxrirpus

    Value Delivery is Keyzs2omkro5zsou0eyg1oofgfxe0gf4zot

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.sjfhwbnu371wsu6eof7ebd72vzei1n7j

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.oipszpmey5t3fcfqy3t2w7kcjvho782l

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.7k68nw8niilmnapl1h74xq98gavns1tq

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?owr80x9jnnbo73z3kl25rcu07a4k4w8j

    We’d love to hear more ideas!mc7ibw9unoh3f0bvucj21tzocfvks1t5

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.

    Of course, this is easier said than done.

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:

    Pain Pain is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passion Passion drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Fame Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.
    Fun Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.

    PAIN


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.

    PASSION


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Fame…

    FAME


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?

      Use Fame to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.

    FUN


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.

    Value Delivery is Key

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?

    We’d love to hear more ideas!



    Making a ‘Tweet This’ Button with # and @

    By jessica on September 5, 2012
    (English → 中文) View original
    Translators:

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?a05b1pmu5cfrcpt2k32nw4hqvaidtl4u

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.
    9c7beqn8az6beim24qep882insss6z25

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:sw6sjfrzucxu4gdy74bq8rqekpm99rbr

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?
    4l2jz2w2jwy6khh4nw02huymoi37oc9j

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. wo0dmbt348xyj5kkeedbodb2ezs7wd7jAlso, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.vhkvgubh9c5hkfcjxz6uhfub3x01oo29

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #p8hv0zgmkib51eq7a1si4pog6tsdsna7&%@z6jf6swqsfvjaervuchwbugzh4f76cjv tweet?wk1umif8b7x0td4x0w3e0hjpkdwjshcf

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.5g4xm593hr7dcxv7ytw8o3muf8pekwtg

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:60lwstvu1mhwkdm3jpsrp4a8d52vnokk

    • lettersngj53sd5jn5ttbhdtzs603yxisuxuuo7
    • numbersy7xhe19uhcw19nrbkutwfjr30at1r0qg
    • special characters that have meaning in the URLk82xrtwu6s2sk145ncl557pewxeuuv74

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.nqpvnkjdv87jefzy8cdwvvn7a2yoeo5r

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spacezic95clercbryk7ytiom5z111grmqeffs, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newslettersngj53sd5jn5ttbhdtzs603yxisuxuuo7. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.x79xtvzzk5rfoxzl953a2iw84vmirdef

    Share on Twitter Links that include #p8hv0zgmkib51eq7a1si4pog6tsdsna7 and @z6jf6swqsfvjaervuchwbugzh4f76cjvg9qwy138mijyed9gukibl1km1szzcnmj

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.nxw1pic7vssu891erpq719k5rq6ad5sr

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #p8hv0zgmkib51eq7a1si4pog6tsdsna7">#p8hv0zgmkib51eq7a1si4pog6tsdsna7Hashtag symbol and the #p8hv0zgmkib51eq7a1si4pog6tsdsna7functionality">@z6jf6swqsfvjaervuchwbugzh4f76cjvMention symbol.lqhj10v2iw0v92bvsajqcv4eipw5oho0

    Common Characters for a Tweet:9i1yqglzmm74tl6kx3xhbypu4tmlksjj
    URL Encoding7fz71xla4mdji1ic6uewmfc18xvmpfmn Character84cf5k5z1ekxymcz0wgs4b3tkia75ij4 Descriptionu1lm2cb2vfttkdmiv836v4z820twv1tf
    %20v3kkpjxbftkubbewgni7wnn4ix6ezulk spacezic95clercbryk7ytiom5z111grmqeff a spacezic95clercbryk7ytiom5z111grmqeff between words in a tweet
    %23dvqs9a3i9enkexezcimf8wbea7a4jokm #p8hv0zgmkib51eq7a1si4pog6tsdsna7 hashtag to categorize tweetsr4bwql5rghecsl1e029cdnr2gu6vzre
    %40bxz10d6c68otavx67k4nv9ekwjrsbkpd @z6jf6swqsfvjaervuchwbugzh4f76cjv at sign to mention another twitter user27od21jrzd1amsm7xus52jfaea01rp0k

    Let’s take a look:6qbbxtor6a7jgog0ickeapulbfkdb0z7

    To make a link that works, just replace spacezic95clercbryk7ytiom5z111grmqeffs and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    That sends the user to this:rjmgcbgz7bfiu5bwz6yvc4zozbqxgofx

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:pzkq6shspc3xk3ooryxs5mmv5yiymcj2

    • Blue is the HTML codexkew3sbkc00vzkc2anjo4msahzkgpckdwddebfgfxf10yszq9ovcdkl8cg604s2r
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link1h6l03z5618r4b5360p3df6700l6gev7fxuugm26hsajpq83c29vekr4rujh72td
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters5wxafd570kymq1f40cbglq030h4u5e50erxvb5lj4e1l81j3w63xpotwicad0ep5
    • Red is the text of the tweetdee4egg0106cy88ooxr6rqoms0gcambdvlzd55mf90rn9ctkx9xzise6rcjru9mf
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweethb5bbr4kv1w83gj71qw1h010s0yjh42otf1d0o5tw50pt442zwa1cfhhjua66mkq
    • Black is what the link will saywpuixofif58674ygyqnhecl17qf8s9hf

    Make a Buttonb74ajlf3am0vu48s8x9p06ztvnjf0wd1

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.mf04tcs98t929giryaswe2ryu4hiw1v9

    Use code like this:4tjltjfvwarn1pk3ka0z8p0400lda6j5

    • Blue is the HTML codexkew3sbkc00vzkc2anjo4msahzkgpckdwddebfgfxf10yszq9ovcdkl8cg604s2r
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link1h6l03z5618r4b5360p3df6700l6gev7fxuugm26hsajpq83c29vekr4rujh72td
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters5wxafd570kymq1f40cbglq030h4u5e50erxvb5lj4e1l81j3w63xpotwicad0ep5
    • Red is the text of the tweetdee4egg0106cy88ooxr6rqoms0gcambdvlzd55mf90rn9ctkx9xzise6rcjru9mf
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweethb5bbr4kv1w83gj71qw1h010s0yjh42otf1d0o5tw50pt442zwa1cfhhjua66mkq
    • Aqua is the image link3qx0qka5p3mm8qurx4ky8cxyc1j987w1
    • Black is what the link will saywpuixofif58674ygyqnhecl17qf8s9hf if pictures are not loaded

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?46xfwg12yywrrxo04ipklidjgdj495c3

     ikty0ei6yz82o9c1nind6x5vplk4kwhs

    (original) View 中文 translation

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. Also, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #&%@ tweet?

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:

    • letters
    • numbers
    • special characters that have meaning in the URL

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spaces, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newsletters. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.

    Share on Twitter Links that include # and @

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #Hashtag symbol and the @Mention symbol.

    Common Characters for a Tweet:
    URL Encoding Character Description
    %20 space a space between words in a tweet
    %23 # hashtag to categorize tweet
    %40 @ at sign to mention another twitter user

    Let’s take a look:

    To make a link that works, just replace spaces and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    For a link like this: Share This on Twitter

    That sends the user to this:

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Black is what the link will say

    Make a Button

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.

    For a button like this: Tweet This

    Use code like this:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Aqua is the image link
    • Black is what the link will say if pictures are not loaded

    If you found this post useful, go ahead and Tweet about it!

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?

     



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