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The Listening Cycle, Part IIq81kgjh5xbkwzcrayrtdnh6qeicnwzedThe Listening Cycle, Part II

(English → 中文) View original
Translators:

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.uvsyg8w1zoj7lx7ze5jmdhn4ux68fm5z

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.xrk5dik3spr2pnzh9z6z39hhbwnvm4e9

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.6n5qvnwyy9jfrp8a7whcrwkm79y9wjes

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.pc0zisz5ej8u7b3y1zkrbbdgkdefvoeb

The Right Tool for the Jobb99nx35872gqbjvzdbon0lpukdw23o54


For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. gcvky1e0zdwivviok7vfatc2fgdertwxIt’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.ogq6eko8uqj3s7digfgifolh33pi8u8m

We have left out analytic tools like Facebookqw26tkj3vmj9r7sn17c91d3urw2f169h Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.qe9ckt62rry0nsznlfg4xyjvv2u8tbfa

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.ktz0ri6w9otavjp1i100r0wraqyyd10o

Online Listening Toolsy0le5nza7def94fy2zpd91nzqmkdkxq8

Listening Dashboardsvxv659ux579xhoj6726n57kc669vq2eb

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.tbpm3n2qiafzi0nhfwmsnwom9adgaaet

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.nrv7ton7thopo0ud04aq4ome65i6z32c
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
    0c08u1361tdrhn5hhfirpukjp6lfzg3q
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.ruhlu4wz2a3zqugkoiz0ddql0pfymp94
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feedhgt8s5opy48l5otwl9k3j8ij6ebl4q5c

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.awy2zs0845uiyape9ev0edeyxmaepghp

<span class=New Content Feedhgt8s5opy48l5otwl9k3j8ij6ebl4q5cs" title="New Content Feedhgt8s5opy48l5otwl9k3j8ij6ebl4q5cs" style="PADDING-TOP: 15px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px;"/>
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.quwbt901m6jx682716vgpvl6kr3yen4v
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.r091xe3qjgqcmbwuc8fuqrcywtzku82c
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.vjezs58r8ev3fp9oxpp3yxsstzkwxk1i
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.ln9487ih48joui4icgs6ma1phnxiwlw8

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.u9l8o8s70lorruhvqoe9r5a55br5d48x

Twitter Listeningcju79bcbaab1wkdtad31afmcdjpw6ie9

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.ie9vw6jn9dg53qra5blnqdr6urxxdldm

  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.qilzu7sv48lqik4mjjp8v8zlifs1ul8b
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.rtchxbdiffq0nti2l8fieict95qboiw5
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.niesf4sgipvxolwhuptgi3ew7ue9k8nx
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.07fkgfovky0uourcj5pu2nfxn0i6xxco
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.vwyvyrls685a744r94la5pgilpo3tm3f
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.w67v1u5xgfs2tuipbub26zt7tfmcmjq9

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.fyxcmf7j8lfbyke4uj0t6qnwin1lffdk

Facebookqw26tkj3vmj9r7sn17c91d3urw2f169h

  • Facebookqw26tkj3vmj9r7sn17c91d3urw2f169h – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebookqw26tkj3vmj9r7sn17c91d3urw2f169h, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebookqw26tkj3vmj9r7sn17c91d3urw2f169h may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Together4eugwhi5q2ayw7jgacfy5pglfam37941

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.m6kghk29i9x70xxeckn75gaa5h2ch58u

    Remember:xm7a78wb6ak6cjcfjqzojm99fr4p5g6s

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identifiedlingb3l5nvo9jp8wvohrh2d3wztqbi5n
  2. Identify opportunitieswyaajrxpbea7du4xkubpu8b269vlyt2k
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?bzltt6wx6bdhreiy18eh4j13nz47f7ah
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?hd1hg1l95x0lh2xfx6x3k06yn8dantcv
    • What vocabulary are people using?58z5lfs4m15779txsmg7jzusozmcdfv9
    • How does it differ?b3esqazf349sffpen1ysyxy34pbckycl
    • Who is talking about your issue?w16znl5ifnzp2oifie367rb0n7vks05f
    • Who is connecting with you?pztbd8z2l6l4daex6kf4kwrywgwwwa1c
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?5j5unoybg47xavt0oz1xv901y872fqub
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategyfebwgje2xphawo1cfx19gpskuh4nm05s
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:a3d7yubhizlpexxqndxo19u4sn92i7dj

    • Connect with influencersj87tww3pwu9acaslk4jsp53lhcn70q9a
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of coursecou54jxr2cd8neomqau82si1pln2mi5o
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.cgk5o4zvc10094kj9gjz21u7ea2rwd9y
  4. Keep listening to see how it is workingvqtm9q1048nsvcyzb6rrlbpxn1j1qafb
  5. Practice and improveopyyzvdka8977gczhu2pgymderjvbjsp

Special Thanksb2vmm82e9cdbem8gusksef96dz9wi4sk

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.f3120h7wys1k8ilsyavknl80anu9lzsr

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!0m60vrufnqpb2wylj9ntv9ot7be3otrf

(original) View 中文 translation

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.

The Right Tool for the Job


For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. It’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.

We have left out analytic tools like Facebook Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.

Online Listening Tools

Listening Dashboards

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.

New Content Feeds
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.

Twitter Listening

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.

Twitter Listening Tools
  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.

Facebook

  • Facebook – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebook, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebook may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Together

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.

    Remember:

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identified
  2. Identify opportunities
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?
    • What vocabulary are people using?
    • How does it differ?
    • Who is talking about your issue?
    • Who is connecting with you?
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategy
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:

    • Connect with influencers
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of course
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.
  4. Keep listening to see how it is working
  5. Practice and improve

Special Thanks

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!



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