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The Listening Cycle, Part I93pev8vky38ab2brgekg3uiyh6aanw8nThe Listening Cycle, Part I

(English → Deutsch) View original
Translators:

Beyonce wants you to listen03yvz828epw5rf23il35ufxpdp1c89fy

Beyonce says Listen

Image source:youtube.com8p2et3e33fyudr19vuojlw5nw4xbj41h

The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.mo7vc6cq7cqp9xtrrww4hd7wv8xut5v5

Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. dwrqsv6nh2owx3o3akgwm0mr819yhjwkHowever, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.aipk15kyt0c7pe74j89f7hpx7laxy0ez

We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.wl8cckya955nlf29zzdy8yh5rd6s4knq

This blog post will teach you how to:gq1ifqehe0w9bssy1rmrpy2ct3cqd56j
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.1roybz1hkx205nn948e0wmi47qw2xy4p
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.7j8dhwrw7nrrophyrja9v832tcl0t9zr
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.8tguk0tjzte0axdetqzjdhfrjk184nl2
  • How to get started:yfby0jlrv6j4prqrpglm1uop78wv36ys

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. an6aa9gesvstn30oxb3berfcn6txztyzOnce you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.lifv1zc03hze9lcfecaeb1tw1tcorap2

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.6j2tfqy1af453z78huk5j8r7yywhbmo8

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.f116eb9tbvcvbo0bnf0w78fr8z80gddm

    Keywords to listen to may include:sq2hfmoqw5hsuxwpvwebsaytondxcklv
    Organization(s) involvedglinkhd3dqmwk4a6qcxf88mnoe4h2539 Spokespeople for or against the issuerk5z94p4198cd86px0qu3w1lx5mb5ezn
    Executive Director or CEO49oaaym1mjvaw0235gnsogl6du992m8x Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you supportam4fftbe3mzdm6gkie5e4xqhvk0sr7rs
    Key leader(s) of the campaign3k89mgnx953tfsukokgthj5fltimug4n Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of9y6frcu9q8qx5g8jjzzxxis9317o2i41
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.9qxxcxeeifd7r74zlp67xsmgb96fvf9u

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.aeanzkz3x723psg5err4z6ea5vl2c2rd

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.wxx3ub434nqciosyhrjcouuk1znvvcph

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.r4gvumjipxva1x6up7fssevmzoas92fr

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.i8a0sob93ridy91p4y1dxs4k6unfr3az

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.vfcbthqo6jnshkx4uwxtju6n41bdntj9

    Testing… testing3j6xr0he2ebdvd9g840v67ekr75zmsdg

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.ujnaq3b6lu1m42ljfpy4upk42qzzrjkb

    Let’s walk through an exampleiw2gvyz0kynpc8h0a5zpa6px2g7jy4l7

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker”ar6h1z29yc7odzjifhx6byq4k6h98yz9 and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”8lqzwzlm3yxqfac0hlr8mktes58n2bw1. Neutralyqko7n4y9gbpuxv56f7pxsmavi3xjwu8 parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”8lqzwzlm3yxqfac0hlr8mktes58n2bw1, interchangeably.rjf3cis8ybtts3vdpe3uh2herolphozy

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.jh1x1nm9mtfr3oqvdje9tpwthwk02euc
     utsiacgdxx3tp6l4b2kb7hrevikqbv2w Allies078of7npwj8fxcz3o02x4xw7cqaa1gkr Neutralyqko7n4y9gbpuxv56f7pxsmavi3xjwu8 Opponentsg0an9863inyhg4927leyf1gz2pj5tsg0
    Search Termsrzxizd04752x99o3waqfboexuhk0g2vy “sex worker”ar6h1z29yc7odzjifhx6byq4k6h98yz9 Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”8lqzwzlm3yxqfac0hlr8mktes58n2bw1
    y435ourlxfts3nfhswx9revgje7ax0zl
    “prostitute”8lqzwzlm3yxqfac0hlr8mktes58n2bw1

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.hp24ujdczb3bcm7vwbutsxkchu3sjcrr

      What I can learn from listening:0hb3f4fh90plgu2tx023soe161i0u7vk

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickrq3n7dnppnvd6v6g6c95ogk5zvqe5crrt

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.t4bn9wuqca1fp1thf9gxpq3bavhzflqz
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?cwjnb0eu4h6pt97fhgnp7ifi03wqphcs
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”8lqzwzlm3yxqfac0hlr8mktes58n2bw1? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker”ar6h1z29yc7odzjifhx6byq4k6h98yz9 and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker”ar6h1z29yc7odzjifhx6byq4k6h98yz9 but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute”8lqzwzlm3yxqfac0hlr8mktes58n2bw1 without “sex worker”ar6h1z29yc7odzjifhx6byq4k6h98yz9 the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.twgvs5ixovl5a5t2c31n109k252qhx71

    Who? What? Now, Where?z9w0xiprnh8rhb7jo118hgee1d995hpv

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.vgfbyc4o88do03kfx0yok0ggh2fpk7y5

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickr85zmg5j4b0i41vgt5ycm53zjyrknyxpx

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:jiqp7ue744p66dsklz0o1dc3td2dpwwz

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?pdnvcq3k38tad161gfjshbzeslawxyfc
    • Are they a Facebook user?qnwcxb46vxyk09khz48khlb3iaq5pc15
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?v1b02obiu0knpfyxukqnxjgfz0yoef10

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.1er6pk0ut479x4cfpi9rd0lrh9o84j2w

    • Where do they get their news and information from?prpucf7ospbdns8ekfsdby8kzhwabl2q
    • Whose information are they sharing?um4zzse09bxydg4ufcsg8wuvfp3si523
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?i0k545luqwkklm0ussa2oc0qxguu892g

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.j6fdqa615o9z0pcz3udgprri90rg5c1f

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.pghaf7wyrey81r669n87nuuyvmgdjmuz

    Where from here?dbxg233a8zkt9fk6mk9blthsdupfqpdu

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.mf9k04d04c8xo9fjibcx96qqj122q9r2

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.u13og55qi7d0l2sdw0fzw1gn7oe66q3r

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?ctb6j87c9di97s6sg8mrfsacewtez472

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Beyonce wants you to listen

    Beyonce says Listen

    Image source:youtube.com

    The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

    Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.

    We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.

    This blog post will teach you how to:
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.
  • How to get started:

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. Once you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.

    Keywords to listen to may include:
    Organization(s) involved Spokespeople for or against the issue
    Executive Director or CEO Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you support
    Key leader(s) of the campaign Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.

    Testing… testing

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.

    Let’s walk through an example

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker” and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”. Neutral parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”, interchangeably.

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.
      Allies Neutral Opponents
    Search Terms “sex worker” Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”
    “prostitute”

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.

      What I can learn from listening:

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickr

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker” and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker” but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute” without “sex worker” the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.

    Who? What? Now, Where?

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickr

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?
    • Are they a Facebook user?
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.

    • Where do they get their news and information from?
    • Whose information are they sharing?
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.

    Where from here?

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?



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