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The Cycle of Listening, Part IIk5qyz4dduzvfmbs91l2jdjt4yaiq0lybThe Cycle of Listening, Part II

By jessica on February 25, 2014
(English → Español) View original
Translators:

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.x6b36xe1s48yww9ufowgfietqv5ebo2z

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.ccf3ezyskvp1ghutiekkk8kvqcnpyde1

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.m44xgns7dh11ae1bq67jqz2m8kexvzp7

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.ihigk3std1vcqr7v9o5vbxcghbxgo8cx

The Right Tool for the Job4sev1fzgc6ov6vy4wvne2v5yloy12zgx

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. t4ugtofoj42lwpobgpbldypu6q5w9zdsIt’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.cly6ifk083e9gjvxty3rf4tc8ijs1hy3

We have left out analytic tools like Facebooksruuhtoqsminyikudqsailiahamuz2ui Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.upr6g1n16e9k422cxa439iqu78qf5q0p

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.sxywu37hfl2ryqskq8t9kqqpkkx6ma85

Online Listening Tools944nqo8epbvxad0r16hyvz73xeng3bg2

Listening Dashboards0ipqqakrvc5abx91h3asjlspsrwaupek

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.in0qoe59anj4hggh2fcmdh77ah4ghhhp

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.cn411q3k01wl103duz23r5tjg5iroj4q
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
    1bzawqgy74u1a4jdims8dbond2z5jj9a
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.zwbxxzrj4i5m3enpqw809b8nn520uvij
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed9l9cnwd02xn9m9j6comtxov4iqq604zz

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.ky71dhqnu02d5ahqd1u1mo2lzff9n6gx

<span class=New Content Feed9l9cnwd02xn9m9j6comtxov4iqq604zzs" title="New Content Feed9l9cnwd02xn9m9j6comtxov4iqq604zzs" style="PADDING-TOP: 15px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px;"/>
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.4wbrj7vz0gwjplptps3p5toki794vn1p
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.0e3j54c1ef68cmynhy7w9n2uomdblreb
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.1y20aagbgsga22qjldmya68rmj8so2og
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.y7k9yayz2xc8b9csdpfww9gohnq6nj5b

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.2iy6fm6njkn99el1iffx57rp4i99js9b

Twitter Listening3lfn2trelxws0bdwltbyopf3jfm83kix

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.nc9cu5zv33e8odhyistwq5etuyyvoz92

  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.hgre5xv35v6keko3zzoq36kjv8ca7sje
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.dfj68uc5icg92lgy9osx7igt25fhxxx0
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.1lptgs3mrmqmwhpu6siso8xtr33rfw26
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.ln6amh7dbzh5mfz79pxbo837oiy8i6tt
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.rbcxuxyu2rqjgbr45bnpnyl8wym0i5gz
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.svbez4k34nikps0i8qj86z94te0hly74

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.m478adyakc9a5nbyzm3y2e2stdh3jm9v

Facebooksruuhtoqsminyikudqsailiahamuz2ui

  • Facebooksruuhtoqsminyikudqsailiahamuz2ui – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebooksruuhtoqsminyikudqsailiahamuz2ui, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebooksruuhtoqsminyikudqsailiahamuz2ui may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Togethern2p5fq66sp0w4tm6oiq1x1hueoyx0ind

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.lw9ns97jyt9g64xo8m238n2mno7ucw2n

    Remember:7b1u7kv49uhbbdppkyphzyfjo68jkwch

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identifiedn5lc13w0wh8dc507m21js2zte6zfv9r9
  2. Identify opportunities1q9v3gcz4bxxnsba3v9lv8xyg6l7e5a5
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?n50k0r02ydnbaj4chqfzm2tvhpnx4p3i
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?yvddszeqekw1qdwso3yozyl0f5kh0c3p
    • What vocabulary are people using?njk0iynp5cnw2so73q51xok1n499jb8w
    • How does it differ?j4pk2tl7v7vywfhbl1xm1e1pp6dl28tb
    • Who is talking about your issue?7v9yq8tlze2pfgbi8tauhy34arkhfimc
    • Who is connecting with you?d5tdx510339ggh5pdmnlx2nkeurfsazv
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?rqzfzihhthy0a4ztdfxn1rm8gwequ7jb
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategyhqgaylssux6q0bswjicv79asrxp8gf7o
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:vtlb0x7r2rdscglhjtlfay8xsyt0ht83

    • Connect with influencers9erujsn9smlc53e304uhvnp3uzft0paz
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of courseif8qjvy1tltles8o78tqk5w5njacogiw
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.qwokigrbb10smziqvs8x740ne12t95mq
  4. Keep listening to see how it is workingr31t4lc0rb8p12cwpctc81sgq4zgq938
  5. Practice and improvefclpb02xu0exklolt4nkomcvbpoc20w8

Special Thanksl4nmzfatzp36l5isyx1tm7xbfbwagtrr

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.art97d1apzujx1a7u19o2xwb48jjf9df

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!bba7dk51rc426z12gyoq3gkpk6fjjk4k

(original) View Español translation

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.

The Right Tool for the Job

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. It’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.

We have left out analytic tools like Facebook Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.

Online Listening Tools

Listening Dashboards

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.

New Content Feeds
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.

Twitter Listening

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.

Twitter Listening Tools
  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.

Facebook

  • Facebook – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebook, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebook may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Together

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.

    Remember:

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identified
  2. Identify opportunities
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?
    • What vocabulary are people using?
    • How does it differ?
    • Who is talking about your issue?
    • Who is connecting with you?
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategy
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:

    • Connect with influencers
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of course
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.
  4. Keep listening to see how it is working
  5. Practice and improve

Special Thanks

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!



The Listening Cycle, Part I0y6q505tmrbxldr2w28kcsghqsaotodkThe Listening Cycle, Part I

By jessica on February 14, 2014
(English → Español) View original
Translators:

Beyonce wants you to listeneg87rs9frmsgdor80eohd9vbanwemxzr

Beyonce says Listen

Image source:youtube.com69f2tg4ckrngq3yq8obh10ejsw5nj1sf

The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.pl5z189qwb192rl1crxr3ae4x0yuwq5c

Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. of5qvxe63u79kf06rj69qwthq2dr0ifeHowever, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.pdqf2n10ssjf3qprmaxfr1ez9c7lq0h6

We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.u38l1j98wiw2d8eqicsl04ml02okayxu

This blog post will teach you how to:820dngqsrz6ri7nkaida4y0u6h9qy1sw
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.jad7f64y6ofzxkxiivwhhvahnx7bd7tm
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.c1qi7xi44vnocw7gp8e6drjm3d5dquat
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.17x6xw9ldnxk7b0dmdn2uzjouuupsuhj
  • How to get started:ufszpm5rbvo9n5abcr6rpetbsbar6hzr

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. 7u0jm0mmoumd03wfeorv47cr3c6zj9ggOnce you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.s997itrpivc94t6g80e9u0pomuo5rs89

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.rhygwdb5a2nxghenjy2f58ojyoew7tfo

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.q757sfd3kagmbn5vvfrmzh7fb0m6ovo5

    Keywords to listen to may include:pxby6ix0ui9a5svl6vgsa7os5ctfnew2
    Organization(s) involvedn8wyj1ywzmzc73ok8hscmur2wckuyrtc Spokespeople for or against the issue955nytmztnq8tuz4luxqdnnzfdmj7b47
    Executive Director or CEOdkftd4sk56g4glr5yok43f0wxvn8xuv0 Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you supporttehbq5bfsa66zvkmhae6w12o6uvm8oar
    Key leader(s) of the campaign02nyy4kw13xjbsu1wfm1v927ea2x96yz Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of3gxnveqhd4oxg0429rrxlkx3eslly68s
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.mje30lc8fhfgpgegc6nyml30c7hl1hze

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.1eamm1buejrsmb3zd63apjwclyild944

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.c19oyb83hb2md1b5ceh43kll6sfkfmhi

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.mfdazyky5ddzfl2gbcahsqor369y8khk

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.sz5oqgchjr6hkua2zbdhq2kuvhdlv7xe

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.4lm8k9r7m10ut20rz1run4s3zaskfksa

    Testing… testingq0wxz1xayk88gbtscde8vfnihbc95m2m

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.e6k2p06r7dh3a7lp9illum416902n37s

    Let’s walk through an exampleltqpfzx8ynqz43v35ncyadlkw76cokuz

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker”48osoei3hr7nlvl7f404cna9owsjxu0r and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”kkoi02n16rvmkjiubvqmy9plhfoez49a. Neutralgl3fian1okita3755tebjfznwwg85f0b parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”kkoi02n16rvmkjiubvqmy9plhfoez49a, interchangeably.b7tbx39246ib553dlk4byz66skgpfzth

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.5g65pc4qke9j3hdutynicwgu91esu4cp
     m6vdmeppulk8x5m2nxcp5nyq4wnkt7l6 Allies73m217u9o4a32ew2zrg3exb44v581pcy Neutralgl3fian1okita3755tebjfznwwg85f0b Opponentskid4xlt41mqpxc061627a8ckxejyvzb6
    Search Termsnemacdhpu5y31kt7vi62ij7hxe1nlh3z “sex worker”48osoei3hr7nlvl7f404cna9owsjxu0r Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”kkoi02n16rvmkjiubvqmy9plhfoez49a
    iqy2abh5c7hu8vd17a4tfh6ictwpmgwu
    “prostitute”kkoi02n16rvmkjiubvqmy9plhfoez49a

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.g1yslh3l1q5t719nk1ubk22d4br3674c

      What I can learn from listening:cj8loe35eofjcj1hc7y0owgmb8drdcig

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickrqiidra1p9578z1ac4dkpa8uwz5yg2fvj

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.nhs5dp194lhf4216w26eekqon2159k9m
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?yq5z5yxxkaqm2eummfp49h0b410qoqad
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”kkoi02n16rvmkjiubvqmy9plhfoez49a? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker”48osoei3hr7nlvl7f404cna9owsjxu0r and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker”48osoei3hr7nlvl7f404cna9owsjxu0r but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute”kkoi02n16rvmkjiubvqmy9plhfoez49a without “sex worker”48osoei3hr7nlvl7f404cna9owsjxu0r the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.xqixk94k63l1zo2ebqhifhog94sq6lhu

    Who? What? Now, Where?3d62s8d1xdcwb2ubqd7vdpohgkh072m1

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.7ojhq2k6wz5w9nkkuk6dm4fzkxgkjaph

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickrbzfxpw9cvmxx79bth96wdkq07ah4f1bh

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:d2fvclv3xi7zy83o36lgwlfwn8vnjclm

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?6sspncrrd7god2vms14nshojlospfz3c
    • Are they a Facebook user?44uphu95hbo8ed54u4gpk3rbunj39bz3
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?lywpuva04fxrf5fmd8r8epb33nsz2nwd

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.epajmm662mohv072l4sg9m38k3q2hbfl

    • Where do they get their news and information from?qf5uwukc0bw6bczitzb5n1vejk65vzfb
    • Whose information are they sharing?zf4pexv5ja4f1jtlikawbj2ftljo0p4q
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?x9688gw06edzkclljomyn5m823a2c2j0

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.edz762zi3p8r8c904h5qgi0o09f6fs1k

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.8igrzue9oz14g2hom703uk8flld5i5wg

    Where from here?ptjrcdfmblaozcsnnacmn5spckmjbhaq

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.y4qmejsjm85nurhov3i4cftycbv98m3x

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.2f41veh7ldfoadqx0az5lvlgh6wcmcpe

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?rywf4e8qhqroxnf169kn17z2azj09joq

    (original) View Español translation

    Beyonce wants you to listen

    Beyonce says Listen

    Image source:youtube.com

    The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

    Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.

    We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.

    This blog post will teach you how to:
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.
  • How to get started:

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. Once you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.

    Keywords to listen to may include:
    Organization(s) involved Spokespeople for or against the issue
    Executive Director or CEO Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you support
    Key leader(s) of the campaign Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.

    Testing… testing

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.

    Let’s walk through an example

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker” and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”. Neutral parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”, interchangeably.

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.
      Allies Neutral Opponents
    Search Terms “sex worker” Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”
    “prostitute”

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.

      What I can learn from listening:

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickr

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker” and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker” but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute” without “sex worker” the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.

    Who? What? Now, Where?

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickr

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?
    • Are they a Facebook user?
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.

    • Where do they get their news and information from?
    • Whose information are they sharing?
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.

    Where from here?

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?



    Text Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizingw3j7sanr9n1qqttjuuu537skdmkjhg54Text Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizing

    By Jordan Ramos on January 30, 2014
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.1cirhapwd92tp3ygnhlmnejgkesgkh5c



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?s9ld0x1rjtv6r5q94fxic2nmzbmdefnw

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.j56y0jdmpun0s7gjku7choqqd6dpnb4w

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. n8sv2z4egoltu1lp8qe4rddg7qc0bgdpBecause it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.pov28p9q54wzwuablh6saigx9jod2xfi

    Just a few use-cases:5igk38r3s950x53sm30clmj7z0x9v9tr

         Harassment reporting and mapmuilgrtzxve2ygdso7cex94irio685rk

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, education0tsv15r1ator3g44ydyl0k0rwerce845

         Mobile Clinic communicationsfktmpns7xyk8uo9dq8914577s0rqv8l0

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in needwp44m9d8c9xj06gbckavg1nprpgehzn4

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in Indiag5pttz0j189p1ineoa20zo8oazaqqy7w



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Think2u7htv8r5ymdszuvluw689ys07a6rwnj

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:p6f90mh703bfwze08n98juiwbxykqpl6
    1. Intimate/Directbhb6gg6chqmgul59dcq9sstwgsgn4gq6

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.sl3ndkrceihrz3box5akl5pveh5rqo88

    1. Immediatewwz2uwgivnasxp1fku93c30viu5tlwc8

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.666xw2tx69mra4qfsmxk0u04ikwki0me

    1. Always on, Everywherejdngv1bwbyp5raqzdrpgxedrjb706o8f

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.7fxum23y7b1nwjf318ayeradumcotuor

    1. Accessiblewhqpekdzl7v52b58qqdgdmoiofzthjn4

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.aum800vlk87hiouar8bsykhuf6icbbbc




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operation92bhwlfjdgiouu3hl7ihsth8s1r4svks

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).tiw6ltkv1fbue5akxg9mbgk8bt3z0cmk

    So, what can you do, then?xbsm1nri0j4ubqjbk4r51vvqgnkjek71

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:e1guxqbgsrx16w91vlfbdmcms0sbd4xh

    • Send/receive messages5f1yyc5sgs7epgibbj86k9yrpelonjfi
    • Manage contacts and groups of contacts6h0f41820nzxyer6ex5729m4mtg48bn4
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messagesfwl04nkwoprahgihcugkqw7906rii85n

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:yu6qbdpqvoly1rq273789jarjg3vq7qf

    • What is required to run it,q89cci13j7vt2tzd6j0ly7eeyvwr158h
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),hjzoeow0uu8sfq6dwtolnyw5glohzrj6
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,qf1sxbqcivingafnuqgybl09czyu96ip
    • Set-up (time and energy), andzbmvyxk7oxsi0c6yso9bz83wrv981m0r
    • Scale.daw6ju1rjvk7nuxsjcdz21y5erueppvt

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.uilwxe3ptlvwzi6zds26eay2r42oprm9



    Use Responsiblytq95bg452a62t5vooqqu7ixw3frem9a5

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:59vyobkgao21d8k3fthcm7k9am6rucyq
    1. Consentzvv0zlz6dzvemgaqx1uoz8ridg37wpsl

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. balkezg18yb0hdwczyxswjayozgxry9tThis way they won’t feel trapped!kakfv1ru9wjq7k7xnjv021zig0sxepgo

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequencyquut41jcnscqubw1t0f00du39sej1udh

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.i8ff5od7tt4lwd5ury8d70y9oopxt9v1

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!e7ppq3cr6awajvfo14u2sct0tlsm0d84

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.cfdf4nwpghpgv1nvc2j83kbv6wzvgeyj

    1. Privacyj3k3c45o7szc7gfs9q942tbxevo5zem8

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.f2cdx0m828q1cyom0dvbo4661aqc6zhb

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.lp0inhcpti0wouy1fiko4cn78pwmnymz

    Getting Startedpm9oks095j8sbk9kaupku503rpxbvzwb

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:b11vh26uylg6gbjlmpuxlywirpgh3064
    • Who is my audience? How large?60qv159zdf5b17f2r0u3i94uh676jkeg
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?ql7u7bd8xbxusnofufr4kas8yl365v6l
    • What do I need the service to do?6wrc1cem2x5ebgzfv03nueu06ktjyp2u
    • What do different services require or cost?znnoblaai4el9srvme4d8b5nnjs4du23
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?twiz4t6ggt5bo5jbu95lm8eb4i87si3b
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?982hyu7c3xedqxtbddzmxch3dhz4lvil

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    gnhmrwzfmfsh62h6bpw9wtbba53nwqs3

    Resources7128s1tsag2c748g95742ywy6jwi6or4

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]zynbsn54ghc7r6zr8kiz8lz33xowg395

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacyf5t267p2q7nwlt7g1165ktgyx9wnemgk

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.
    tx9kbvutwqhaaxyuo1dkzd0hcwjjnja7

    (original) View Español translation
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. Because it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.

    Just a few use-cases:

         Harassment reporting and map

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, education

         Mobile Clinic communications

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in need

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in India



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Think

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:
    1. Intimate/Direct

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.

    1. Immediate

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.

    1. Always on, Everywhere

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.

    1. Accessible

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operation

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).

    So, what can you do, then?

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:

    • Send/receive messages
    • Manage contacts and groups of contacts
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messages

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:

    • What is required to run it,
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,
    • Set-up (time and energy), and
    • Scale.

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.



    Use Responsibly

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:
    1. Consent

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. This way they won’t feel trapped!

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequency

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.

    1. Privacy

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.

    Getting Started

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:
    • Who is my audience? How large?
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?
    • What do I need the service to do?
    • What do different services require or cost?
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    Resources

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacy

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.



    Trust in the Cloud4grsgebdia2bazj8vcf0h7vcf1ibc3s7Trust in the Cloud

    By misty on December 4, 2013
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?arp6g0454be60rypcspbmft6gpeoxc8y

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)w23mxubt3g6pgd7zz07uddm73kf9c3dz

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleadinggn22ljxk5uyq7chc2enwewt4jit9ye44

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.maq7azojel7l0pq9yic8u4rl8xy0wuq9

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.fj412q2pubysykj7oevxq0jr7wwlthrz

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.zhpq9y70j9sgivqsjnm3r65q86qx2zbr

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist01o7xnta35j0qb05411napbm634xnrle

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rulemdkmvzifk9uiofqwrqjoj445sgmhj0ow

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.5fj31o46m5l2xviaung7knt18diy4by0

    Questions to consider…h6efbxidkudrv8sq20hfg33p8vh2khzr

    • Can we get our data out?0c9mxjkkg4jnstmdv21ayybhiwunzjep
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?dxxoge016z9q3ffhdvrc1nsmkfyghxgl
    • Is our data secure?f39w3j3q39y4119noxur2j2feidkg1wl
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?sofg5w1qtm66d629oqlb6913hkiw0yzj

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolvedoa3h6rz8jhvr6tddojcd9xz9imlo1c0f

    Benefitsiwkji1eg4s63xilj6aqq5ho0lx1n37cb Unresolvedjz2inq0qongm6hvwr6n960df1vxm7img
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    ip8rkbk6yd9t044m2ntg0rdse75e62ce
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards
    7qi4abtouqkt5dtqqmvxxkqw6zqisp9p

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationshipsvat0kt488mebtnjdxmzgfg5j0bw7zwrk

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.xuaz808zaz6v1mb9iiehgzufg8a727ip

    4. Your DATA is your digital power8loti9m5qpfkhy3p8wwpcd43xpqszvjy

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.wqcyq7cmzz6fbcdmn0m2sl33mnwkhun4

    5. The Cloud is in diapers3e0lf6ll8rxbnqm0j5uf8b24bl2ugaaa

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.k4out85i0hqzzwdqu30m1jjh6w9lxc07

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?vu254h1pg6z7xrn6khjbfyb55d8oci1x

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:rucg7di9bmrek9f0un511sqxtaud14fj

    • Where do you have accounts online?ipw1phc3g5iq3snsa2xu6esio537sid0
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?m5o85biob7958jybnf3rgpoy7o5fjkov
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?08c9ony602yp2ory58ubjemmrq98kz8a

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).6d0xw4759cq2w31u2d2phmm5hoxi2gvz

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.nlo5s6q2j2iq8892cbqvadlibhmr0yld

    Resourcese350arjd2iqygx2mje63ydr1l1g9n7rr

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?1vjde0zeazslwqn3dzc82gh4bpg6jcra

    until next time,
    misty
    fy7fxdxwiu0orvgqvbla65gserk02ru7

    (original) View Español translation

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleading

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rule

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.

    Questions to consider…

    • Can we get our data out?
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?
    • Is our data secure?
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolved

    Benefits Unresolved
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationships

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.

    4. Your DATA is your digital power

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.

    5. The Cloud is in diapers

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:

    • Where do you have accounts online?
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.

    Resources

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?

    until next time,
    misty



    Social Media Toolkit Released by Greenliningaodecxgb0ssxtc3nb1l1jptnav4yjnokSocial Media Toolkit Released by Greenlining

    By misty on November 5, 2013
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.0er5w3kykow604disuzq790qvi6gnyge

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?ujrp8vho4y7irb3na2vklt7zyu3eosa9

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.okv037xhuc3htw9jkm32zhtb5008wugb

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.xu2c5vsw5hfhntxj9eqj5qbjn8rzty8h

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.6q5y60mrbj8c7v7uqckxcef7k5kv4wr1

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideas0d40hsjheb1of2e071xq7elflgzs582w

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.wcwakpzj99tv226uzp0xtqh7rc2zccfy

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content8hddezwsck47t9w0zfeap9oxcnzxeo9c

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.wn20my593vdln66fe3mnoi6hkm5qxoxj

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.2aq5bwepun4gz2xtspc0474hrjtzem17

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.1ife8hg5mux5uq61loj7fg4dmeirv69n

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?vqa707ub22ocrkyht1kebvw03vhcscad

    best,
    Misty
    3q8kzanllzwkz99khmzmhv21ddsue2g8

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!0qjv2p46yyos5s1wrsmc37yc1tf1mpuc

    (original) View Español translation

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideas

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?

    best,
    Misty

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!



    Preparing Your Computer for Translation Purposes6xizdm9k4pcxmj3i3m2g137di4ypctm9Preparing Your Computer for Translation Purposes

    By JC Sanchez on September 12, 2013
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!29purtnbokf0givg6nfh1nwhume5qllj

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.mh1jjmbrm8dfmjggk3ew22b5l3oqrzs4

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!er8d3aoofuqxyynzsd2wrbcemugh7l3b

    Language Packages7i3pd12cd2hnwsff0934n941lbf3m95j

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.s5j4oesdzb0pdpg6pkxopshuy6oktu5b

    Finding These Packagesombwsbrxurawi77iypids4dlm2q7zxie

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. n4r5qhvie5qchlcnbdxcm47o74e8rev5If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.hv4g17roucg2ef4lj8fji0zt5lcbo1vv

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. lyqv2niylneugrqr7mmbr7liznalt535If you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.pvi1zg6jx7mq3i1t2ha7i1hfi6cb27eh

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.63oad0qz7exxg6r1eggebrhtdijlj95f

    The List9iyzabwkjy5ske22ra3s2ku7d0l9rafr

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:y54mzrmis8e6eaug5fbm0at82y81q9je

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. ubou6hsumdbpyaj3lav6g0sd5hwunwq8You shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(6y5eh9pko541ozrr2iqiu1hl7ssao8jl

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell firstpwrmozcwd4g78sgcxriov6kl9k54f8lv

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.omfckkwu5t9e2gp29qpvpfkz4fdeeaut

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.fi0y3687tdj9miyc7nh8dk5misns67tc

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.42tuu6zq7qdr9r5zvm2qbxkqt3sfuv9o

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.0124x3yakpnywrfs4aofx8fzyzd30y4r

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!hdn4a4hnpbv0fkpsoeihquia8zmiub21

    (original) View Español translation

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!

    Language Packages

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.

    Finding These Packages

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. If you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.

    The List

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. You shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell first

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!



    Embarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution2znwlaonjy8gfpxfmigwrjyzpmetufdnEmbarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution

    By jessica on June 20, 2013
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.99rw61vttjgapvf5i50mjen6t1o21sc1

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.acrvtqzkewptyc71m2x63xukrz3253m6

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)
    ptj5e4g4rdzi3cyvv8jd6r8cxv6rcphr

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.dctj6mqnm8biq36z2pmvn3mgq6aehvfl

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.aqpka28s4snc6yv1lpko8kfb0xcxb54c

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.opzudz7uh8x1tg4vvdowcdb3nufli9zw

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.xl2yw41pns7euivnttz9j0eqk88hs7hg

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?6hn1x8c1bbzrwk4xr8r3o5zug30ck3yg

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.kyfti4tloarg1kv90evasyv3miljr6u1

    An RFP represents:dpa5ad7r4zinywnqqaeiodnrlgkm5uc9

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.s62xdaobzxad3xxkiy0ps70j9v5auy8c
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.gc8l39fs8qjqgb7zf3q2qf0kgbblvge2
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.mze8t7o9zia39pydbpfx6nhkn9hccehp

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.wslkvv16snnlm45vjzlxvehsn083ajbw

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:i3zhb8qtrrg428e4o62y3u9t9c8nn9ev

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.o8n41oha0jpzwm6j2bbbkkruzswgn8j2

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.7amlpd2jjxg042xe577c2kf7ep9e80s6

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:mojmtb2njgbc2ymy7qo6oj8lozcyktzx

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.inbefq28fxl18gwszeaetvnddeyosgw1
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.wm360409rvu8uyn4qkvkeo04ia0tg082
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.n1os09c4gx5lwiwx6ipf2b3rx6tpry85

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.ukyoa945tbylj941dz9xj6zv7zxcwmog

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?3g1ssvy0huqglbdbbe2spak0mc8qoj5h

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?ucmvbisd5w1b4vm4rcdndxon0rjmyzoj

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?oz3g5ap3qou5d3cark8z9hdwlkyk0bze

    (original) View Español translation

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.

    An RFP represents:

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?



    Crash Course in Online Activismjghjleg72xrvj1g7zxz4qleflltjhktrCrash Course in Online Activism

    By misty on April 26, 2013
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?ydwveqba2lev7mmnuujzxyrzn2vtvz2k

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!5qitu5mz2otvitp2rldy9eo4rf9gug9p

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?1d7l3fdv0v1q20oigtop4urzfto4bip2, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.o9p4mq79o7gatm4mq7nrd5no86rbr7y5

    What is e-Advocacy?1d7l3fdv0v1q20oigtop4urzfto4bip2

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hubg8ackyeurlxm49qhx6f2amg54v7ca7vh

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!ausfd8blcvqgvyy5fxtx7onfp74td2qe

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. n54pbna0cgrpj9iz8o9nl44yl3yvdizqCheck out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/ywz03eoos5hwg3axx1rvhjvlk1eyr5ig

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.nk56bvx5jx9ss0kcc6h8x8v4s0k8sn55

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!jjgye9wpeejzy0tomd3g139egf6fhrjq

    (original) View Español translation

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.

    What is e-Advocacy?

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hub

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. Check out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!



    Pain, Passion, Fame, and Funryzp9z2o3da2yij9hu9hnpbyxb5bupsbPain, Passion, Fame, and Fun

    By misty on January 2, 2013
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?fc7nu9rwn6xyb8sizp4uisjfx76a8lvd

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.eginrdcfkzbsy9yfk1onu6yeexvfuuwz

    Of course, this is easier said than done.5cl8ai598i35ztpq0gg0is11ssnsmrdi

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.w86ct4h4ejdh1vyigd9dof45nognvndi

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.apymejg6r056ovpu81dka90fu2ju3sr4

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:p78fhxxq4hfwbdg6iphrvlep0z41aemp

    Pain0flq96bwk5o38pqmp2hy9z5cgfklo14e Pain0flq96bwk5o38pqmp2hy9z5cgfklo14e is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passionitmp9dgjq55oiyszt2qjllwz4bog2n9a Passionitmp9dgjq55oiyszt2qjllwz4bog2n9a drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Fameu4hz7aygqqoeo9ct5c6aijvj1qijlmk6 Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.eogguzj8s3xfepln8qktikjfg5dh5da9
    Funpxb95qfwqsp5u1e4gm41eztlymu332ui Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.le32q4eg3ryuz25yqs88itpd4jxssop3

    PAINxngdivs4jy7kxwfeyn8xwqzi3zevocqc


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?g7fun1evlbh35co9i2ngwq5eieru93hf

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.24703c2yxu7za3zbdwau51ib1ea1h5aa

    PASSIONfqdk4pignqx1mqtfwq1f98hh3yxu12c7


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.mv1puorfe06fyn3csd9s7gziaf3511he

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Fameu4hz7aygqqoeo9ct5c6aijvj1qijlmk6

    FAMEeula1h7jmx8b8nlzt6z6wm8jmq9zx882


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?abvkmdolhvzivnvt3ulv0x4sa4u53ul4

      Use Fameu4hz7aygqqoeo9ct5c6aijvj1qijlmk6 to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.spe1mlt86di3nvxo8vuyulvhzjy1ihs1
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.q4cafksj5dnhdbrgz4sc5ji4l5816mum
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.cnh8bbfjctbq6p4r23lmd8zgissv9ybb

    FUN0f1mz8ngyi0zp8gy7eyubt0vldzs3q4t


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.jhi35fr70va0gopbsavdubp90tdro0wy

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.hbl3hfa35ii2hh0bue7x5xs19s3nivaq

    Value Delivery is Keyg5n3cytgsmr40rstv0jhz1vbiavkc8pi

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.4stqkx2fjw0zu6kqa5rux9uuqqicc7c7

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.v6eckjeapyscw7b082jp3exh33t733tp

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.ku2zsi58gq1pq43fm792j3ezbjhzm3gw

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?t85ltmz3m9b2r6u7k4kx78h4pf9udzgw

    We’d love to hear more ideas!cs4jytlu65l3i4l2n1zyqr5imcmcha7j

    (original) View Español translation

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.

    Of course, this is easier said than done.

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:

    Pain Pain is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passion Passion drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Fame Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.
    Fun Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.

    PAIN


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.

    PASSION


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Fame…

    FAME


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?

      Use Fame to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.

    FUN


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.

    Value Delivery is Key

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?

    We’d love to hear more ideas!



    Making a ‘Tweet This’ Button with # and @

    By jessica on September 5, 2012
    (English → Español) View original
    Translators:

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?bftnp1ft5fm8bozdvh0zdkbfgcx72z94

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.
    2fs06m836duy1dsg12ypjkzyqv9777xz

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:l3nqsrts35jdhy4lcm032g892ynb5adh

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?
    gsi0qvgva726xhqsaw7fb0ggnqlqkdbq

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. 01co074truimljttoc6ccxdne8dclribAlso, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.81bjhaflas8ub74vce3k0x1o6q7t7g66

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #2ijje4416dyuvt6o4a6wxnm9v09bqe0i&%@gayiir9aueaqlxfkstdtv86ab6fqyuu5 tweet?5ilt26wnnrijyqd7mlq9mrxgcns0f32a

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.we6x3bqitaaeh940ki04ad0kq1ld7zjt

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:07juj5xnax3xxdvrpp0n1tb3dwlgk8na

    • lettersy1mceog1x1byy6nq8bcoufvc3dttdk12
    • numberspjkqv99tgh16pdgtxeaf0fkwwfou0a8g
    • special characters that have meaning in the URLov5q8ss7lma88orth0mzcjm7nwf9c6nq

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.9aee52yremi4ve1utu9ckuzlnwgfjoxj

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spacepvq0dizy4xq9ifijd0vee5tw74aruigas, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newslettersy1mceog1x1byy6nq8bcoufvc3dttdk12. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.j8yztdvv41ki4e2zuoy89hr4y7lrfvnp

    Share on Twitter Links that include #2ijje4416dyuvt6o4a6wxnm9v09bqe0i and @gayiir9aueaqlxfkstdtv86ab6fqyuu58wm4jcncwubwzbce9tpm77q56na2xdtw

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.gelz0ff4ea13pz5zxd4uv7w6yo32kkzr

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #2ijje4416dyuvt6o4a6wxnm9v09bqe0i">#2ijje4416dyuvt6o4a6wxnm9v09bqe0iHashtag symbol and the #2ijje4416dyuvt6o4a6wxnm9v09bqe0ifunctionality">@gayiir9aueaqlxfkstdtv86ab6fqyuu5Mention symbol.fq5zdyyije9n8afyhzyv6tyyo5cfvfd0

    Common Characters for a Tweet:geipz3jpgozk6d9msj1s77q9j8rkc1ui
    URL Encodinguzoq1ghp61o4h038avacae7fladvvxwf Characterdnignk2vlbviwled3etqbaypebryshtv Description6tm14qvn8bwqpvav688y90fad6u9rako
    %208wtpfvacaqigjdlcvugm9hjux7fcy2ww spacepvq0dizy4xq9ifijd0vee5tw74aruiga a spacepvq0dizy4xq9ifijd0vee5tw74aruiga between words in a tweet
    %2367wii889cf7n23lmt3f8fqik5tu86oc3 #2ijje4416dyuvt6o4a6wxnm9v09bqe0i hashtag to categorize tweet187asoozg2908hwdy9ul9emmqdhl7gqy
    %40ka6qxva8zyi1yx680n9m9es0m9ujs8g2 @gayiir9aueaqlxfkstdtv86ab6fqyuu5 at sign to mention another twitter user90uct0nhal1yj9p1i7w195gxa5wbeide

    Let’s take a look:quwcn1oufqai2ki1ka822r0pjm4p7dsn

    To make a link that works, just replace spacepvq0dizy4xq9ifijd0vee5tw74aruigas and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    That sends the user to this:xup5kf6rkgd47i1dfog6wqudfrqpuf4i

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:932hvo2g0nmu5vbcokhwso42f8qt9mo9

    • Blue is the HTML code9wts0r7p6roar6sss0nth90nbdnsddrcv9x1xrr7h140caktzurk2efdwd0ltv7f
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link8miieb95gygy4tihlybhshz0npcjtehrhkbyelxcynw09wskm192at8d0qh6oltw
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters6corsvb286r5yzroeei63qzwh1ksrf6oophlmk6t6f6dls2h0ngxq17dponx61xk
    • Red is the text of the tweetdhdwic1jhgi0adilsjpj2xgwoh7k9wtc4113y37otkwfnlch2rtz2nr6yoeu0euu
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweetge43fnpmtz9wf4b5nwdxsrcb70raiymp3v43tmqky65h6vngmvnjd9cyp55qtrrn
    • Black is what the link will saynj4fhw65kh8uockvc3yv1sd33zyqdg7q

    Make a Button44xfei9ngrl5bd8axwhodnr2komuy6qs

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.vjijf430mtv0uxzldta1jacpyjfq84pu

    Use code like this:fnygq0t182f2ub0bk44m3u80tw7pgp8m

    • Blue is the HTML code9wts0r7p6roar6sss0nth90nbdnsddrcv9x1xrr7h140caktzurk2efdwd0ltv7f
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link8miieb95gygy4tihlybhshz0npcjtehrhkbyelxcynw09wskm192at8d0qh6oltw
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters6corsvb286r5yzroeei63qzwh1ksrf6oophlmk6t6f6dls2h0ngxq17dponx61xk
    • Red is the text of the tweetdhdwic1jhgi0adilsjpj2xgwoh7k9wtc4113y37otkwfnlch2rtz2nr6yoeu0euu
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweetge43fnpmtz9wf4b5nwdxsrcb70raiymp3v43tmqky65h6vngmvnjd9cyp55qtrrn
    • Aqua is the image linkf8o3sn80gmzggfmmp0ph3uwlghiobaig
    • Black is what the link will saynj4fhw65kh8uockvc3yv1sd33zyqdg7q if pictures are not loaded

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?425o2eoqokdnosbbruuowyyhjjq10axu

     2v76fx74b6mp7kmtbg687219ajhgcnu4

    (original) View Español translation

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. Also, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #&%@ tweet?

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:

    • letters
    • numbers
    • special characters that have meaning in the URL

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spaces, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newsletters. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.

    Share on Twitter Links that include # and @

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #Hashtag symbol and the @Mention symbol.

    Common Characters for a Tweet:
    URL Encoding Character Description
    %20 space a space between words in a tweet
    %23 # hashtag to categorize tweet
    %40 @ at sign to mention another twitter user

    Let’s take a look:

    To make a link that works, just replace spaces and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    For a link like this: Share This on Twitter

    That sends the user to this:

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Black is what the link will say

    Make a Button

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.

    For a button like this: Tweet This

    Use code like this:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Aqua is the image link
    • Black is what the link will say if pictures are not loaded

    If you found this post useful, go ahead and Tweet about it!

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?

     



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