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The Cycle of Listening, Part IIsyofd6zfuhbqdajsqmq05d37l5lhahstThe Cycle of Listening, Part II

By jessica on February 25, 2014
(English → Deutsch) View original
Translators:

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.vtcpgf85wbo2fgy9h7yrdyl4u64js6nd

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.7yu99qnwhlheoo6yhxb3rhsvfz2icjz9

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.3t8aw540znt841dhifrfcx2poqljnb5h

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.bgi5bdjafwx909vh9c9yuto8yhmoxsvz

The Right Tool for the Jobs5ov6f287l7fcel62sfmn1nlaabxdt2v

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. wd3anheiv8i1k9ebczo89m7a33gwopvaIt’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.s8issfenurudi43cvh4kckznutixzz1i

We have left out analytic tools like Facebook8v6yl32cowo8w7djvjo4qrez1xphxevw Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.xxiyrb4cyh7ir3rt91zpl4prl1hd0xyn

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.bwa8cpletyhqwl05j7le7yl09yk1p1tq

Online Listening Toolsksdcdcfrzzs3xnaxhne9vl66nuvwhytr

Listening Dashboardsg9mmyqvbcfj9k5099azyyw1wa8x2n15t

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.7o78zdpoizu44psk78stn15kpm8yyhov

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.hgx31j2lb4o4g4hkfigbcbob7di7elzl
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
    g2p2h5nl8fkfmnnhitzmnokr6kpu0ui6
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.altdthlvysfw5pbdrd73jco3uq2n6dn6
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feedr74u9lowv3sqt8zad7rwd8l3tf9at4oa

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.waul0h5i33fqmpfmqtuqy60h5z2uyrel

<span class=New Content Feedr74u9lowv3sqt8zad7rwd8l3tf9at4oas" title="New Content Feedr74u9lowv3sqt8zad7rwd8l3tf9at4oas" style="PADDING-TOP: 15px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px;"/>
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.aw1emea2n2qd33hkeu2r73s1kcfm3973
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.thjdaleu7f0et1rgzrhb84zg0rb47kzr
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.z83ayi4qu475ul3nmjd1oqjw4v0jkcta
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.qqjnx3x0c2ed29d7a4s9up6wdvt06jym

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.jzxyqcb7as530mooihuh84zkvca4l8iv

Twitter Listeningzedqjtbiastz81ixaqtw1348hzk59vlz

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.lxiox2f0hqz8kfd9vql5rrkkwmmyu725

  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.ea9r5ra4sc6t6f8ht99852f49qm646s8
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.zbe7j0f5habk0akaw9jzd8vf6e70oire
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.xqcgczxyzbzz88f26iiv6p03tiy1unui
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.68btc28q097pyf85v3hmc77n31s1zd0w
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.uezy21z791hlat0k9q7zsfo5szgbhvn2
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.rdr85fgrmiqaxt9wjws6w92xyw1zog15

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.zd7lm09jnyg060kgphqwk9pgqwvzaop0

Facebook8v6yl32cowo8w7djvjo4qrez1xphxevw

  • Facebook8v6yl32cowo8w7djvjo4qrez1xphxevw – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebook8v6yl32cowo8w7djvjo4qrez1xphxevw, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebook8v6yl32cowo8w7djvjo4qrez1xphxevw may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Togetherai4eegacsn7sdlwrju0orsq9drfylgvm

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.exekb9gx4oxo0cpbwp5k0l4oeshnc0oh

    Remember:si14d4dxcjnqth0weiwmlakugu3ydw8w

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identified9ummq5xbhnwsvabxymrpfx6nquvvpsnp
  2. Identify opportunitiesmfr5azcsoi3coem0xxhqi34s9dy58n6k
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?00f7busaevawiky4x8qs3skytx2y9280
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?4f7w85gdre1t5a96t3dpulydcf4nim1c
    • What vocabulary are people using?8cy25ymg2g96sjjpofjklftscxnv8nu6
    • How does it differ?guxf5jf83whfi8c9cihaqfhbnghvcv0j
    • Who is talking about your issue?pgrkl27yh940gkqm88kwwsq9tmuhcevr
    • Who is connecting with you?0a05u921aca2kjkcor8grk3bo8tplukb
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?lb5lpi7khagcwxfoarj80qj4lew1o7k0
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategyrkpheffylz52egrvejdggt3j6y2yiyd0
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:vlcf962hsfbb8cl6zjo76h1ukm4rlsc6

    • Connect with influencersgmidngpihdh3k8zi3jgyf6060sq465ud
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of courseu7nwpanhp8omvdal3u70idybjtbep1v9
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.a53o0s5bpru14amvc3oxtuliogmxvphw
  4. Keep listening to see how it is workingirysytfjl4injmi8rbsjzpvgu4ykdpcm
  5. Practice and improvej1o91whnvsnencdobjzahhpn2uean4gx

Special Thanks95jezf8d95azk68i79kv5cx2qhrf44b4

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.std43kbkoxhez9k6iam95q6d2k5j2prl

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!rng4xluftj7fi1cn1wybgbr5s1wwd15u

(original) View Deutsch translation

The listening cycle series has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

Listening Live

As we outlined in Part I of this Listening Cycle series, listening can give you an idea of what conversations are happening around different terms used to describe your issue. You can learn a good deal about the people, issues, and conversations that you are interested in by conducting simple searches. However, this method makes it almost impossible to keep up, and for most of us, listening and communications is only one small part of the work we do as social change agents.

We call it a “cycle” because listening isn’t something we should only do at specific points in a campaign. The campaign will evolve as conversations morph over time, through highlights and even lulls. Stories may go viral within different groups, and you’ll want to do your best to keep up. If you are trying to stay on top of – or even change – the conversation about your issue, then real-time tracking or automated listening becomes especially important.

Now that you’ve identified your search terms, such as key stakeholders, influencers, and vocabulary in Part I, let’s talk about tools that you can use to make listening and monitoring conversations about your campaign easier.

The Right Tool for the Job

For this blog post we focused on no-cost tools that organizations use to monitor people and conversations they are interested in. There are plenty of tools out there that you can pay for, and some of the options below have services for pay, but we feel strongly that most of the tools and services you can get for free can meet most of an organizations needs around monitoring. And you should certainly use free services before investing any resources in something you have to pay for. It’s also worth noting that monitoring social media is a highly dynmamic and rapidly changing field; new tools are constantly emerging.

We have left out analytic tools like Facebook Insights, Twitter Analytics, and website analytics tools. Monitoring how your audience is interacting and responding to your messaging is an important part of a healthy breakfast… or, a strategic communications plan. However, knowing how people are responding to your content is different from trying to learn about what conversations you might nit yet be a part of or how to connect with audiences you are not yet engaging.

That is what listening is all about. In other words, monitoring analytics and metrics around your web and social media content is an important conversation, just not one that we are addressing in this blog post.

Online Listening Tools

Listening Dashboards

A tool to use to stay on top of social mentions by creating and customizing with your keywords, searches, and other data, so that you have one place to check for notifications.

Sparkwise Listening Dashboard
  • Netvibes – a dashboard that you can create to pull RSS and other new content feeds. Information can be organized into tabs and widgets for easier browsing.
  • Sparkwi.se – a powerful open-source tool designed with civil society organizations in mind that can be used as a listening dashboard, as well as a place to create visualizations, and as a storytelling platform.
    Note that it is still in Beta, but there are lots of widgets offering a variety of monitoring options.
  • Storify – functions as a dashboard as it is a place to check for notifications and new content. Storify works well with social networks that do not work so well in Netvibes right now like Instagram. You can collect and save social network posts from the searches that you’ve created into stories to keep track of conversations over time.
Storify Listening Dashboard

New Content Feed

Places to grab RSS feeds for listening. RSS, or Real Simple Syndication, is a feed that you subscribe to in order to be notified whenever new content is published.

New Content Feeds
  • RSS feeds are available from many blogs, websites, news sites – look for this to subscribe.
  • Google blog search – search for blog posts and pull an RSS feed from the bottom of the results page.
  • Google AlertsGoogle Account Required, you can have alerts delivered via RSS feed when new content is published that is relevant to your search terms.
  • Bing Search – pull an RSS feed from Bing Search results page by adding “&format=rss” to the end of the results page URL.

Pro Tip:Check out this blog post for more information on adding an RSS feed to a Netvibes dashboard.

Twitter Listening

Tools to use for deeper analysis of stakeholders, followers, topics, and issues on Twitter.

Twitter Listening Tools
  • Hootsuite – set up an account to listen on Twitter through saved lists and searches. Also used for scheduling posts ahead of time.
  • Topsy – a search engine powered by tweets. It can be useful for analytics and trends as well.
  • Followerwonk – a Twitter analytics tool that lets you explore your social graph.
  • Commun.it – analyzes your Twitter community to help you better understand relationships such as influencers and suggests who to follow/unfollow.
  • Twopcharts – can be used to find the most influential active Twitter users for cities around the world, as well as for widely spoken languages.
  • Tweetlevel – can be used to search and analyze Twitter data around topics, hashtags, links, and users.

    This can be especialy useful when digging into web traffic analytics because it can be hard to know what link people follow to get to your site from social media.

Facebook

  • Facebook – search allows you to use hashtags, similar to Twitter, but it will also let you search for keyword searches and also for people. One thing to keep in mind when searching on Facebook, however, is that people’s personal privacy settings trump everything else. So, searching on Facebook may not produce the most robust or accurate results.

Putting it all Together

Once you’ve tested out some of these tools and see how they might work for you, provide insight, and answer questions about the people and conversations you are trying to connect with online, then the real fun begins.

    Remember:

  1. Listen online to the keywords, people and issues you’ve identified
  2. Identify opportunities
    • What topics are people talking about along with your issue?
    • What are people saying about your organization? Your People? Your Issue?
    • What vocabulary are people using?
    • How does it differ?
    • Who is talking about your issue?
    • Who is connecting with you?
    • Who is a big influence on the conversation that you want to be a part of?
  3. Incorporate into you communications strategy
    • Some ways to incorporate what you learn from listening include:

    • Connect with influencers
    • Share the other’s work and thoughts, crediting them of course
    • Use language, style, and frequency of messaging that seems to work to engage your stakeholders.
  4. Keep listening to see how it is working
  5. Practice and improve

Special Thanks

A very heartfelt and special thanks to the community of online listeners who have shared their tools and best practices with us in order for us to share with you. We are especially grateful to Matt Fitzgerald and the team at Upwell, as well as to Susan Tenby, the Online Community and Social Media guru at Caravan Studios, for their commitment to listening and sharing best practices with the community.

Have a favorite social media monitoring tool or tip you’d like to share? Leave a comment or send us a tweet! We’ll be listening!



The Listening Cycle, Part Isi16vlzg4celbmcg1hyyfyivopbu0efiThe Listening Cycle, Part I

By jessica on February 14, 2014
(English → Deutsch) View original
Translators:

Beyonce wants you to listenyjhk8791uga2ih0dtcqczw3pd0hh3hzs

Beyonce says Listen

Image source:youtube.com529fhp027clk5q7zhbscf8htna3m8ne3

The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.9v5cf1ppogel3uy84isuo59tanlolv0k

Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. dy99gzyhfsbvno3xawznxveim8j0ai9dHowever, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.zejyda429t29sfeyo9mjooag5rmp0kkq

We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.te4r8mkdz7f8cz1cfbu02uvrcwh0p3o8

This blog post will teach you how to:98p934lq4t5adauugfo1dyg22w8eiy3i
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.bw2z7a6f1lv7bvoishryxu8dfz5jz2k0
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.y63dd6wt5a1ftez6w9l6ufrrh1tftsci
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.huylibh1kkrb9ztuqto3vb12b4q19eth
  • How to get started:yafvbbhc23x9hxo4036i7t79hs1lg2x5

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. hudczz334gps7vgz3z2j7udne7ekku6rOnce you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.ujf4hs00pqt785bdsfggaww7uvjhfje0

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.qmlojny0xljrka4zb971elvvwfnahygx

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.rtxensjpcv8ohvg54bsfwzno8zkxx2ef

    Keywords to listen to may include:tvfdbh5ze90pquqjp8phg0clofyfjvo2
    Organization(s) involvedr7zdni5ujv8rr4i09t109mecxe7suplc Spokespeople for or against the issue5s4w7clc87gt39b4q4r2taciyxakcl38
    Executive Director or CEOea39ogfnao6jch5pxq8b1t1kri6m1vu5 Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you supportavrtqaum01v353ybxjhdlii8bjrwjqdj
    Key leader(s) of the campaignnyfus5s4qwloh8affc8x7pywdle83nfh Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part ofj1ket0q3frspad20w5gz9deje3gh30gc
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.idnw619zkdirunvif9silzztn37eevdn

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.b04yib6756c4ld36gzovh1o2qxndz9p1

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.s8bpevq5fv5sfjcwryv2asoy3rd4gsfz

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.4goj6mmbvle0dv3chbe9o7g3k8t7uygp

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.yzac1gk4lzrhxgs88wm8ld2g9w8j2imr

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.a4aed8gd6rlt5oiwq4i3gf97uqni5dg5

    Testing… testingv1jkrj4f0st7aeaflgnypp43c7nocvpx

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.9m7mtekxqnirm1mjl9w1se39easheasd

    Let’s walk through an examplez8jq9xc54i6cjvhezhzmysupkxn4dbn3

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker”j9ydj6bdz5ny8w6n5gg76ga8or6y8z6i and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”yekdqpu4qv31bh9m8omsa6fa6pn8c6h1. Neutralewlzf40hy5ke2co1xv1neitumysfrybw parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”yekdqpu4qv31bh9m8omsa6fa6pn8c6h1, interchangeably.tlabi57rxmugodu5yj6pckpagk5d5bvo

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.908lt37kfn0cws6wprn341ux26evbxya
     vx0r8ev5969q01hx2mahduqc3pg21z8m Alliesoa9uhlqrkafbnitojnykqmkwgaxsafyo Neutralewlzf40hy5ke2co1xv1neitumysfrybw Opponentsslmrgyxejeqtl41xnty3h2cwk5xunoj5
    Search Termsi335f186kdg2ttdhuxwb52jgvo9uswq1 “sex worker”j9ydj6bdz5ny8w6n5gg76ga8or6y8z6i Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”yekdqpu4qv31bh9m8omsa6fa6pn8c6h1
    n6pjyggysodcdmzo0s33e955orpnyiyb
    “prostitute”yekdqpu4qv31bh9m8omsa6fa6pn8c6h1

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.m2q0g5l3hnuw4dii4st5qvvscnazcmko

      What I can learn from listening:wgu4hsxyn7na6xac3q41fjhgsjmwn2m9

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickr240r7roeezwniukqhvcevqhzhzaonjqf

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.99owx8xd5a61dquoe13schh0pyyz61x5
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?fxu15oocwkxwp4m2a5ans6f0dd4r501a
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”yekdqpu4qv31bh9m8omsa6fa6pn8c6h1? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker”j9ydj6bdz5ny8w6n5gg76ga8or6y8z6i and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker”j9ydj6bdz5ny8w6n5gg76ga8or6y8z6i but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute”yekdqpu4qv31bh9m8omsa6fa6pn8c6h1 without “sex worker”j9ydj6bdz5ny8w6n5gg76ga8or6y8z6i the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.vny00wuvqoo10oyfhavayxrhta01w04i

    Who? What? Now, Where?z1p6wpix2ove4e9ft3in6p4vbrip30vs

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.5pec46rebz5agb1d88q1mxlw18o0mh1h

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickrtd2hc4iv29ens7b9mdge3nlxq6ua4ynn

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:5lfsmdej0hndq238crzly2ck7msv0m6w

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?90phkokmu0d9dtwr8l407d8hq5u39oz8
    • Are they a Facebook user?mlcj3ji4kdlb7y7dpxdkt2pns7hwalkn
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?lffjg10z7htvq8hu8i63369x0o793wfe

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.1vva9i0a70hrg6cm0r60wnw35aza9k01

    • Where do they get their news and information from?rz7w72ai2c4dvz7hxzrlkin1bgbe8kdq
    • Whose information are they sharing?qw56ijsblvts3x296r80vitqg34yeqzu
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?3lph1c7r65gp4pfnxq5ggkcaesrvtg8m

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.74uxw3crd34yflsg0qfp6qtmtybpdspa

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.0z3i5a7vnps1kkmpgq3r2in56jaf48ev

    Where from here?domao34a8zxglu036pi7n378mqyvjynm

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.hlez3ead2i5u7lb411nlwe255r02rhgy

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.83uckzl63gdkya47pm3bje86frt1d7mb

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?jflxt6x9e11nk9xx548de52p9csqmnav

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Beyonce wants you to listen

    Beyonce says Listen

    Image source:youtube.com

    The listening cycle has been co-written by Dirk Slater from Fabriders. Dirk has two decades of experience supporting social justice movements and is a nice guy to boot. You can find him on Twitter @fabrider. You can also find the version of this article on the Fabriders site here.

    Social media has changed the way we consume information. Most people will learn about world news or major events on social media before they learn about it from anywhere else. For advocacy and activist organizations it provides huge value as it allows them to get messaging out without having to get it noticed and vetted by major media outlets. However, the real power in social media is not about broadcasting but in its ability to allow advocates and activists to listen and understand campaign stakeholders and key audiences. This allows them to craft messaging that meets them where they are at.

    We’ve been huge fans of the ‘Big Listening’ techniques shared by Upwell and have talked about them extensively in webinars and trainings that we’ve produced on social media. What we wanted to do in this post is present a ‘how-to’ on listening within the context of an advocacy campaign.

    This blog post will teach you how to:
  • Identify key stakeholders in your campaign and where you can find them online.
  • Look for discussions either directly about or related to your issue.
  • Learn the vocabulary being used so that you can craft messaging that will engage stakeholders rather than alienate them.
  • How to get started:

    Before using any technology it’s critical to know who your key stakeholders are in your campaign and what you would like them to do. To be clear, when we use the term ‘stakeholder,’ we are talking about the people who are impacted and/or involved in your campaign. Use the Pyramid and Half Wheel Exercise to understand who your stakeholders are and what tactics you want to use to engage them. Once you’ve identified the key stakeholders in your campaign, you know who you want to listen to online.

    Next, you will need to identify what you are listening for. For this you will need to start with some brainstorming and then do some online detective work.

    Using this Campaign Listening Template to capture what you find, list out the different keywords and people associated with your organization or campaign. Try to make a list of anything that someone might mention when talking about you, your organization, issue, or campaign.

    Keywords to listen to may include:
    Organization(s) involved Spokespeople for or against the issue
    Executive Director or CEO Names of campaigns, propositions, or programs that you support
    Key leader(s) of the campaign Events, protests, or actions that you’ve been a part of
    Any #hashtags you’ve created or used frequently to contribute to online dialogue about your cause.

    The Campaign Listening Matrix Template was developed as a collaboration between Aspiration and Fabriders. We used our combined past experience of working with campaigners and listening online to inform the development of this document. That said, it has not yet been tested in the wild. Try it out and let us know how it is useful to you or how you have tweaked it to work better for your campaign.

    We’ve put together this Example Campaign Listening Matrix to help show how you might fill the template out for your own campaign.

    You may have keywords you want to listen to online that don’t quite fit into the categories on the template we’ve provided. That’s okay, list them out anyway. Each organization and campaign is different, trust your instincts.

    After you’ve figured out what keywords you are listening for, look at where your stakeholders are online and notice how they are talking about your issue. You’ll want to visit and listen to stakeholders in all three groups from the half wheel exercise, allies, neutral, and opposition. Go to their websites, blogs, social media accounts, interviews, articles, and papers published online, and use the template to list out the terms they are using to talk about your issue.

    As you list these out, look for the most common terms that they use. These terms are keywords, or the words that have the most significance in how they talk about things. Some organizations may need to create two keyword columns, one that lists the current vocabulary terms and the other that lists the desired terms you’d like each group to use.

    Testing… testing

    Now that you have some search terms, it’s worth using google on them to test out your assumptions. As you search each of the keywords, look for clues that let you know how different stakeholder groups are talking about your issue or campaign. Do the results support your assumptions? Whether yes or no, this should inform how you use the vocabulary terms in your messaging to connect with different conversations happening online.

    Let’s walk through an example

    If you are a sex worker advocate, and are actively promoting sex work as ‘work,’ then you would know that your allies are probably using the term “sex worker” and opposition tend to use the word “prostitute”. Neutral parties who are less clear about the terms would be using both “sex workers” or “prostitute”, interchangeably.

    Words that people use to describe sex workers give insight into their attitude, feeling, respect for the people.
      Allies Neutral Opponents
    Search Terms “sex worker” Both, “Sex worker”
    or “prostitute”
    “prostitute”

    Pro Tip: If I use advanced search function, then I can specify if I want to search for results with both terms or one without the other.

      What I can learn from listening:

      Listen. Understand. Act.

      Image source: highersights, flickr

    • If I’m searching on google for references to “sex work” I want to think about using either of those two terms depending on the what stakeholders I want to learn more about.
    • Are there surprises or challenges to my assumptions? Who are the loudest voices of support or opposition? Any new stakeholders that I should consider?
    • What other terms or issues are people using when they talk about “sex workers”? How about when they use “prostitute”? How can I incorporate those terms and issues into my messaging to be a greater part of the conversations already happening online?

    In this example, if we look at both “sex worker” and prostitute – we get a huge number of results. If we wanted to find results for “sex worker” but without any use of “prostitution” that number is far lower. And if we look for “prostitute” without “sex worker” the number is way bigger. So clearly there’s a lot more work to be done on getting people to respect sex work as work – but this gives us a picture of how often the language is used on the internet.

    As you learn words that your stakeholders use you can use and adjust the Campaign Listening Template to keep track of them.

    Who? What? Now, Where?

    The other side of the coin is to keep track of where these discussions are happening and where these stakeholders are actually talking about your issue. So once you have identified who they are in the half-wheel and pyramid exercise you can look to see where they are online.

    Organizers review keywords

    Image source: dirkslater, flickr

    So if you have identified new stakeholders, you’ll want to do more detective work about where they are online, and again look to see:

    • Do they have a Twitter feed?
    • Are they a Facebook user?
    • Do they use blogs or online forums?

    It’s also helpful to think about who influences your stakeholders and who they follow online.

    • Where do they get their news and information from?
    • Whose information are they sharing?
    • What #hashtags are they using and responding to?

    Update your tracking documents by keeping track of their online presence. Writing things like each group’s Twitter username down now will save you time later when from you are using different tools to listen online.

    By first identifying your key stakeholders, then identifying the vocabulary they are using online to talk about your issues you are better able to keep up with the conversations that you need to be a part of. All of this better informs your ability to influence the dialog and encourage allies to engage deeper with your cause and neutral parties to become supporters. It may even inform your tactics and strategies of neutralizing the influence of people in opposition to your cause.

    Where from here?

    For some of the tips to engage in conversations online after you’ve been listening, check out these Social Source Commons blog posts “I’m Monitoring Social Media… Now what?” and “Pain, Passion, Fame, Fun”.

    Next week we will release part 2 of the listening cycle, containing key tools you can use to make ‘listening’ easier.

    We’d love to hear how listening online has helped you learn and engage your stakeholders more effectively?



    Text Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizing3x6yuwnfcauutkf7nw3h43ojwjvyh6daText Messaging for Grassroots Community Organizing

    By Jordan Ramos on January 30, 2014
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.4a2b6g6ztpx3xkbynllevucfcxelkhfe



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?0a38gvwywebm70tvx1hxoi9dzm00r4qi

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.b7440nxisig1gpcl63bss4uhjp3e2gw4

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. mug4r8kdgln9mob2vmh1c67d94bvnofzBecause it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.x2860nk4ypcfiep5ynw6k2sla5xybasy

    Just a few use-cases:6tae50vk3htfsrfo2nzo9zejjtz1roon

         Harassment reporting and mapxa1dpgqz1h4mxtxx149vsnid6usxp6vc

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, educationrrik5znbmi4lwc4tqefc7g8flyg3x03e

         Mobile Clinic communicationsx3g5fqk1by0t3pcia8ljh2aa6i5gm0i9

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in needdyy4cyp353cnmt1mmsqd0vtkgmu8v6jz

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in Indiaesnm26fi8yhsgmhgdudzcr85a3ubvtkz



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Thinkaegcib0hvhtougjl3fqv8yils2d5ze70

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:bx83grwc7ck4hd2t3u1scg68lvyo1pl2
    1. Intimate/Direct7snsu35y2ucwfdv291kk680jx1ax1syz

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.7fquz9wbf2jp7oz1pmcceajp55aw1kpz

    1. Immediatetke5dmvnnx1sskzvyx1e9zcrioa8kbd4

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.gysyckwm5h5mhpu5qxwpmfg0kx7avfm1

    1. Always on, Everywherepmh5m0q8kyclldtdk1967nlydji45emk

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.dxb40hmi52dbqp2l2mve2e9kq12ve86i

    1. Accessiblex29detxnnqtk76pct5n4s959rtakv54i

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.nve8i4yrvn0oi120fa4ogu0xy0n0t0o6




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operationnr1p91scn083bowgga22ifdztmlg8gcl

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).d5j19uqrvgyxbmswaeadi2t7ak2ctcpx

    So, what can you do, then?e7x8voxlh8ne0yne7xkudkbos12t51s9

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:7k6a4ds6aucg5xh45g8x8uo7n5jjehzb

    • Send/receive messagesgoifkelf670k29dz2pc1e8x6ccxoe2dk
    • Manage contacts and groups of contactsoad10fc4kj5nz3quzffl2l5l0h9svk79
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messagesfw7oyg4uyesrwxlpvn178zf1oongu3lz

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:nijswiw2c9yccry1sd4avu6hduh2umg7

    • What is required to run it,vlweu16sqm3xr2beolpd17wwj0u7tmsf
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),971ywwmsyhbh3qn17fzgmfvllkz0v1dv
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,ne3re7jp18gflziffwvd7hf5j8my9rmm
    • Set-up (time and energy), andvhxvcqbfx3liitvrb3ygdcnk7eg2prgb
    • Scale.ouoglf618pak5s8hrm4jq40m2ixrzpnd

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.fyjl1ygr4kf6k53d6dqmeir3rpbxz914



    Use Responsiblyvwhccxgk4ll3akf4y4717he9wtkf4w4q

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:1nj9jdoh8asutmstlx2sokh70xbd0phs
    1. Consent99dvzeg6l4gfqxnoh45dbxp45k4zg7sg

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. ybn98eq8zirxdpusnmqd99m8gv9m4vrtThis way they won’t feel trapped!u07k9p5n3axcwhqpwlntduobf3xljli3

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequency09rgfmv17zl3fi2e0dijbfqqio40dvu4

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.wceizhb1fcbn95wi079mxnpfl8rtxsxj

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!9yk11ur1npi8lsp400060u52nrd4y7zy

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.fpmx7rgf8w7gmtibnavwxepz7cjisx9y

    1. Privacy189dli3gxcdpxpvmqa556l5a4hmcds94

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.hnp5wzlrxv14548wi1mkh2bhr4edjxcr

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.fl5w7g3kxwp1e2lossmzajyoe9oeqlyw

    Getting Startedbap779ih0nugecy2zriwd3h7cfsb3sn4

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:rq5zjr0a0o0d4aturiht63nez2lcsy99
    • Who is my audience? How large?4fosj2xq3yot526qzhe9r57zxr8a66i1
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?v11wzlpgztbekdklw8huf1yx4fmxn7w8
    • What do I need the service to do?lndifmz5d5yzzpwfsfkxkvou93g14o8f
    • What do different services require or cost?hcfbyyelgx4x0haujehd6g8xqb4i1x08
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?u1ymy9bi1p8cj9n8qvva80rh5z8ww3ph
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?is00mo1xnwx2kshxd5q06lbe92fb8djh

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    h8yayn1q5fmia8c75x8y0lh3ep8dx2n4

    Resources29l8twoqccrrl4piqei789fwbcsoidma

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]vlutk31c5ggt8l1rpxo9ljsy6yawrctd

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacybjakek1o5z4qg1ejyo67xjy5t32fyix0

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.
    6kedrehgdvi8ilkxq9eot7kh0agrnklj

    (original) View Deutsch translation
    Text messaging is more accessible than ever and can be a powerful tool in direct community organizing.



    Text messaging can have a huge impact on movements by enabling always-ready access to information

    Is Text Messaging Right for Your Work?

    Short Message Service (SMS) can be an effective method for communicating and interacting with a relatively large audience of supporters in a direct and engaging way. Despite their reputation for being exclusively the domain of large-scale fundraising – or even Stupid, Pointless, and Annoying Messages (SPAM) – mass text messaging services have great potential to be used in grassroots community organizing in a way that can greatly benefit your mission (and your community) in the long run.

    Text messaging technology is old, simple, and cheap enough for it to have become by far the most widely adopted form of electronic communication, even in rural regions without internet connectivity. Even where coverage is too spotty for a phone call, a text message will always come through as soon as coverage becomes available. Because it requires only the most basic infrastructure, SMS is often the tool of choice for low-capacity and community-organized projects such as citizen reporting and journalism, connecting people with doctors and educators, allowing lending and payments over long distances, and providing farmers with agricultural price updates.

    Just a few use-cases:

         Harassment reporting and map

         FrontlineSMS Projects: Legal advice, mobile payments, education

         Mobile Clinic communications

         Hurricane Sandy Relief: Occupy SMS connects aid with those in need

         Text Messaging boosts farmer incomes in India



    Why Text Messaging Is More Powerful Than You May Think

    Text messages are great for communicating with people on a closer and more informal level than is possible through e-mail or even a phone call, and it is far easier to actually engage your audience. Unlike most other forms of communication, text messaging is:
    1. Intimate/Direct

    Unlike e-mail, where many people delete far more messages than they read, most people still read every text message they receive and keep the ones they need for later reference. Specifying distinct command words that your SMS service will recognize also makes it simple for recipients to reply as soon they receive a message (or later) if they are interested.

    1. Immediate

    At a maximum of 160 characters per message, messages are small enough to be received a few seconds after they are sent.

    1. Always on, Everywhere

    People who have a cell phone often carry it with them at all times, meaning they can be out and moving and still receive, read, and even respond to your message.

    1. Accessible

    This applies both to the users/community members/constituents who subscribe to your messages, and to the experience of you and your organization. In the United States, 91% of adults carry a cell phone capable of text messaging. On top of that, it is cost effective to both send and receive text messages.




    All services can be set up to use rule-based logic, where it checks to see if conditions are true or false, then determine an action based on that.

    Text Messaging Services — The ‘Brains’ Behind the Operation

    Clearly it’s not possible to text message every one of your contacts individually, let alone read and process all of the responses you receive, and group messages pose obvious privacy issues and require trust that no member is going to spam the rest of the participants (because you gave them their phone numbers).

    So, what can you do, then?

    There are countless tools that fall under the category of ‘SMS Services’. (Short Message Service Service — like ATM Machine, or PIN Number— is kind of redundant.) Each tool has the same set of core functions:

    • Send/receive messages
    • Manage contacts and groups of contacts
    • Set up rules for how the service reacts to keywords and messages

    The main differences between tools are that they vary heavily in:

    • What is required to run it,
    • Where it actually runs (both the service’s ‘thinking’—which can be a smartphone, a personal computer, or ‘cloud’ server— and its texting ability—which can be any phone [with cell service], a GSM modem, or ‘cloud’ server),
    • Cost of messages and the service itself,
    • Set-up (time and energy), and
    • Scale.

    While we won’t be addressing any specific tools here, at the end of this post we’ve included the set of tools we have tested and used in projects.



    Use Responsibly

    While SMS is possibly the most effective way to reach out to people you are trying to support through your work, if used irresponsibly —which is easy to do without meaning to— you risk alienating your community and supporters (making them former supporters) and can breach into the realm of becoming illegal SPAM. We want to help you avoid doing that and also make sure your supporters feel comfortable participating by maintaining the following:
    1. Consent

    In order to send multiple messages to a person, you must earn their consent to do so. If you have a list of participants for one of your events and their phone numbers, you are allowed to send out a blanket text message offering instructions TO consent if they choose. If they do not respond, you cannot send them any additional text messages. After consent is earned, it’s always good practice to respond to their consent with clear instructions to withdraw their consent at any time. This way they won’t feel trapped!

    1. Content, Tone, and Frequency

    Content: It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but people who consent to receive a particular type of information (example: upcoming events) usually only want to receive that type of information. Messages should be as brief as possible to address the major topic of your message. Don’t make them read a whole paragraph! If you are communicating several types of information, you should also provide ways for your audience to opt in to each type.

    Tone: When you’re talking to humans about human things, it’s perfectly appropriate to talk like a human. If you want to ask people if they are planning on attending an upcoming event, ask them like you would normally, but ask for specific responses to communicate ‘yes’, ’no’, or ‘maybe’ so your service can read it and make it useful for you. People feel more comfortable responding to a message when they feel like it comes from a community member rather than a bank!

    Frequency: Messages should be consistently spaced and as infrequent as possible to communicate your goals. An even better practice would be to provide a way for your audience to change options for how often they receive your messages, so they know when to expect them.

    1. Privacy

    There are two reasons for maintaining the privacy of your contacts: 1) To protect them by allowing them to respond (relatively) anonymously, and 2) So they do not feel that if they DO opt in, they are going to receive messages from third parties or other contacts.

    In some cases, being found to be associated with your cause may put supporters at risk — for example: if your community consists of undocumented workers, you MAY not want their identities known. Additionally, participant-to-participant communication might actually be a legitimate short-term use, if personal information about participants is concealed by your service.

    Getting Started

    Questions to consider when choosing a service:
    • Who is my audience? How large?
    • How do I collect contact information from participants?
    • What do I need the service to do?
    • What do different services require or cost?
    • How do I maintain the privacy of participants?
    • Do I need to be able to change the service in real-time?

    Here is my rough guide to help decide which service might be appropriate for your specific use [PDF]

    Resources

    Below are the tools I have tried, and my assessments of many of them here [PDF]

    For further reading check out Tactical Tech’s Mobiles-in-a-Box: Tools and Tactics for Mobile Advocacy

    Creative Commons Attributions: Arrows designed by Tobias Klepp, Share designed by Anand A Nair, Protest designed by Gilad Fried, Cell Phone designed by Alex Hartmann, Cloud Settings designed by Agus Purwanto, Laptop designed by Olivier Guin, Light Bulb designed by Ema Dimitrova, Settings designed by Joe Mortell, Tips designed by Lemon Liu, Thought Bubble designed by Irene Hoffman, Radio Tower designed by Jon Anderson, NFC Phone designed by Andrew Forrester, Comment designed by Icomatic, Iphone designed by Hedie Assadi Joulaee, Signal designed by Alex Fuller.


    All other glyphs fall under Public Domain from the Noun Project.



    Trust in the Cloudb47k3wtm56qenxujyhebxuzhyzjm22y3Trust in the Cloud

    By misty on December 4, 2013
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?721r52t5hc3csuls4fo6bycox1d266c4

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)dmqdeq79x4caezf252nn3b3dbenq4s58

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleadingx2ajs0r6trspfyo1n4w10y0w7inofiy2

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.mk3upwalyzvbke7wj0m4bxtkmlrn12se

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.muqjq5ysa2fj50pzxv7uophceduw3w9g

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.ka6tjmg4a34gvxjr74pryo50i04wrkc2

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist8jrpqj60wstpwhdybf2hfr7g43bu4uo3

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rulec2en4abjlqgy7vqrffcr5gn9jrwoppos

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.2o8a2b39h34j5o34u5yubtw77fqa7700

    Questions to consider…bs2wzuchvx9410ggqvjfyo54dklf6qv7

    • Can we get our data out?m5bz8jq26jyp60b7oep0cy0o97lny73a
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?c9637liskelsmuo234tl0ur4fdysxqg0
    • Is our data secure?vfjbtq20h6bpjf0pw6vi18if9gdevbwh
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?mjdy99c7v1gag9vkbey3olrdxmpjvc97

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolvedc5p2pa4xrw3vd28f85kocg0tmsk5cv4f

    Benefits8c9vp3jvbnrtwumty3g4x1jv2zq3qkvo Unresolvedb9i1mwpf56yoilwusx2h5berjg89x24z
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    hikytbxurw6xk481xqyqmxzpo2y7tvh1
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards
    0ox6xy0jo5dbh7k78ri4mtqhzmct8ywz

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationships6gz23dqxau1kiqeddkdc2ese27173q8z

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.ib86c2313hq558rmclkyz7nzgc2ydqzl

    4. Your DATA is your digital powery86f5jlulzw2u63wlcju9nsn2gbgic16

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.6c01lkd2hc1nszyr0k4gx11lr4o30dww

    5. The Cloud is in diaperseyc5jlmavo78obb3eapjkva0xaipzeq3

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.5kpaz4e091ut4n6yt0sm8r0g3gduye3t

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?tb9662mxv812n60ngbovould7129b7fv

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:uimea774a08y2aua9d89p8co1mhdrsvc

    • Where do you have accounts online?kmgjq8hu6de2zlp5o3tcvm34psu0rb82
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?64lz3z4uvbksbz2gr2l3la1x3fetb5p7
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?hzcku6hyofqeghep74a6hkehh2wkl4xt

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).fwst55z9oyws5w9zzc9l91j53o528rie

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.loupu27ns5l16f36ln4t743lprdz3jce

    Resourcescs6ua3zwo09449yjivqfd0v1wgqm32p5

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?0twgi9dh3rikpwss10odoc3p9airh6h7

    until next time,
    misty
    tonj9g8lfv65cwmj0jvy15y9nwiir5qb

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    anothercloud

    Are you considering using the Cloud at your nonprofit organization? What are some implications of the use of the Cloud for nonprofits and social justice movements?

    (Hold up, if first you want to get caught up on “What is the Cloud?“? Read from Mashable or LearnFree.)

    Calling it “The Cloud” is misleading

    The Cloud is sold as a nicely packaged solution to store your data in one secure place. The reality of our current Cloud use is different. Really, the Cloud is a densely fragmented patchwork of services, models, and tools that you use online to store, edit, and share information.

    As technology users and consumers, and as social justice workers, we like to think about how storing and sharing information online may effect our organization or the people we serve.

    We’ve put together a few thoughts over time. The following list is by no means all inclusive but hopefully presented as a path to start conversations. We are inspired to collaborate with you around the awareness of shared responsibility as activists using Cloud technologies.

    Aspiration’s Cloud Considerations Checklist

    1. Follow the Hollywood Marriage Rule

    Technology relationships do not last forever. Technology changes. every. day. When selecting technology, think in terms of future seperations.

    Questions to consider…

    • Can we get our data out?
    • Is our data really our data, or did we give it over to someone else?
    • Is our data secure?
    • Who else can see our data on this technology?

    2. The Cloud offers real benefits, but much remains unsolved

    Benefits Unresolved
    Makes new collaborations possible
    Increases availability of info
    Improves efficieny in communciation
    Allows for mobility
    Maintaining unified online identity
    Undetermined control of data
    Unclear third party actors
    Fuzzy open standards

    3. Most cloud solutions are uniquely unleveraged relationships

    Most cloud providers hold too many cards. They are uniquely leveraged in how much data they have and what they can do with it. Better checks and balances systems need to be put in place.

    4. Your DATA is your digital power

    Putting organizations files, contacts, and data in the cloud raises rather than lowers the stakes on protecting it. If it really matters, keep-up-to-date versions locally, along with Plan B.

    5. The Cloud is in diapers

    The idea of the cloud is still young. Don’t trailblaze or make big bets if you don’t have too. Rather, model on others’ success. Time will tell and teach.

    Nonprofit Brainstorm: What’s in Your Cloud?

    Before considering the Cloud or reviewing your current Cloud use, a good place to start is figuring out where you currenty put all your data as an organization. Start with these questions:

    • Where do you have accounts online?
    • Where do you put files online or contact information?
    • What internet services are you using to house your data?

    When you start by taking an inventory of where you are at, you can get a real sense of where you stand rather than getting paranoid (or nihilistic) about your cloud use ;).

    NptechReality

    Thank you to Gunner for sharing his tips on the Cloud through many nonprofit technology trainings and inspiring the blog post. Thank you to Jessica Steimer for helping to get our data house in order.

    Resources

    What are other things to consider before putting your data in the cloud?

    until next time,
    misty



    Social Media Toolkit Released by Greenlininghkdfvauspv27ph1qvxoh439qxyu31j49Social Media Toolkit Released by Greenlining

    By misty on November 5, 2013
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.xt4lm9msgmxnk7nl8aceitdyaqkct68h

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?auqwz3klo0tn4ab0idlwf00thxzpjrej

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.wj8kh0rsaq6ad9iywwxj627xq5yn2otp

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.iqqqgwhiwg0g4p6fty97xmx1gvf2lm8t

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.7ailpe91abug9hdjzxcpvgtmrn1ppron

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideasi0vf0m5pqi35ob6ipavwrdla8m0anf7v

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.xw9ym35b72xzm6v1qtbqvuv5hv2uy8dl

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Contentyy9fsrrlsgpjv5nfu8qsfd32ybyc3j5r

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.pctiaw3xxhzvfodpa514kz56toq7ux4a

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.ws853gw1gyv0vb1kqhg91gheqcc75twr

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.5ob9m2qw4indedacofr4832jnqm3xqwt

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?j53jpz6gzyxkjv16gkvttfgstn7rmbrw

    best,
    Misty
    a5kwo2z8ie5aakd9mobjhxmc362arkgr

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!gb81ei87row64ymnia1wxnldslp2r12x

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Greenlining Social Media ToolkitWe admire JC and Braelan, the good folks over at the Greenlining Institute in Berkeley. Today, we want to share out their newest publication, The Art of Listening: Social Media Toolkit for Nonprofits. The strategy guide is filled with social media strategies and tactics to really build a foundation for your social media presence as a nonprofit.

    Is there anything better than to hear from an actual nonprofit (who has gone through the hoops) about how nonprofit technology works and doesn’t work for them?

    And, it comes at a perfect time for us ;)! We’ve been thinking a lot about crafting messages, creating content, and building self-serve templates to help organizations plan their online messages. Read Engaging Network Hubs or A Template for Calendaring Your Messaging for more.

    And then, BAM! We saw this! In their toolkit, Greenlining provides sample templates to help you plan your content. All photos are from Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit and we recommend a download.

    To start, if you are strapped for time to brainstorm content ideas in the beginning of each week or month, use this template to get your content generating house in order.

    Greenlining's Social Media Toolkit: Weekly Content Ideas

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Brainstorm Content Ideas

    Then, use the following as a sample to plan out how those ideas will get distributed across your online channels, like Facebook, Twitter, or email.

    Greenlining

    Greenlining’s Social Media Toolkit: Plan Your Content

    Practical steps and bite size templates like these help to put ideas into action.

    We’ve had the pleasure of sitting on the sidelines over the last several years watching Greenlining work hard to discover how social media can help build an online community and shape dialogue about a topic.

    And now, they turned those learning lessons into something useful to share with fellow nonprofits! Thank you JC for getting at the heart of helping social justice advocates and organizations communicate and listen online.

    How do you manage your weekly content and social media presence? Any tips or tricks to pass along to fellow nonprofits?

    best,
    Misty

    Plus, share the social media toolkit and tag @greenlining!



    Preparing Your Computer for Translation Purposesrl9ixwjyvf3um6ubntn00684eask6yrnPreparing Your Computer for Translation Purposes

    By JC Sanchez on September 12, 2013
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!t2lfam0qlfa79k314aqsiaaslpv1igf1

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.jehtm0560g2gp4m6iaxksxv7ezwzaxkk

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!y39z7tte7vnebvyoaq6yo4tibdashrf6

    Language Packagest3ix4a4339xtyb6thzodqx7q2akzafku

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.udbqppn7mvdzlt95tiii8u5uftkmywki

    Finding These Packagesito2bsvzg4j7j1qutedofzv04v3lhtsp

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. ca6fiqiad3yn07jy5c333mmjmdjydypgIf you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.fdkhx52sr369y5z2d7gptt8x5kwrsdyy

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. y7iyycnux2ixo7jdrivdbl2dso4jyjcmIf you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.8nhqkt6i7czre2n65zgobp5fn0fvjnei

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.41bh6fsp8t91tbgd16ty9oadhc4foegi

    The List42zrc425rljzezi1r3ywyc84aalrsd0n

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:leksp53jw8a1gbb2tqsgazufkbvonqgy

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. rbd4yci6gllluak0lp3i2xyo1z3ooi05You shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(kkryq3wvfsutsnuhu34qyd9ujyks3oke

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell firsttgbj977pku46bplrr0fl4ztzetundljx

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.2ue5sujk8vw1d8ck8fqgs4emap50nijg

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.4xdmxintarokl74xbc4humliqn1zrbal

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.f59y89ki9gxsj2ee186782woq403oiuu

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.lbflx8sghqo5df6afcdkn9cow1munxxz

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!p8orvjyjb9fjipzcbp1yf2qmfkp3w09c

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Here at Aspiration, we love to use free open source software, so our go to office suite is LibreOffice. For those of you who do not know what LibreOffice is, it is basically the equivalent to Microsoft Office suite, but better because it is free!

    I was recentlyHelloHola doing some work in Spanish. If you have worked in another language other than English in a text editor, you know right off the bat that the software is not, by default, set up to automatically recognize and spell check your work. To enable the spell check you have to first select your language under the “Tools” options and then ideally, boom you would be done! However, this was not the case for me.

    Just like the Microsoft Office suite, LibreOffice also supports different languages. Just as we would expect, sometimes open source software does not work the way we want it to function. Since the “change your language” method did not work, I had to look for a way to make spell check work. If this method already worked for you read no more, but if it did not, fear not! I got some tools for you!

    Language Packages

    In order to have multiple languages ready for editing on your computer, your text editing programs work with what are known as “language packages.” These language packages are dictionaries that programmers compiled to work with text editing programs, such as LibreOffice, to enable spell check or also in some cases they can help change the entire computer’s interface into a different language.

    Finding These Packages

    There are several places where you can find them, but the easiest method I found was through Synaptic. Synaptic is a graphical package management program that makes life easier when dealing with packages. Usually, language packages can be downloaded from your operating system’s website or also through a terminal. If you choose to go through these routes, it might be a little more challenging since it involves a lot of work, but the beauty of Synaptic is that it decreases all your work to about 3 clicks.

    Note for Linux and Debian Users: First thing to point out before continuing, LibreOffice on Windows and Apple computers does a good job of downloading and apply the language package selected. It was with Debian that my roadblock occurred, and I would assume that this might also occur with other Linux based systems. I know Debian by default has Synaptic installed, but for Ubuntu users, sorry, Synaptic is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu 11.10. If you have anything before 11.10 you should be fine, otherwise you are going to need to install Synaptic.

    From the web digging that I did I found several different language packages, but not all of these packages worked with LibreOffice. Even though not all of these language packages worked, don’t count them out yet. They are still useful with other text editing programs or with your computer’s user interface.

    The List

    Below I have listed some of the language packages that I found with descriptions. I have also embedded a toolbox to the right:

    ispell – This is the most complete language package out to date. It is one of the most popular ones, but it will only work in plain text, LaTeX, sgml/html/xml, and nroff files. Also for those Emacs users, this would be your best pick. Additionally, it did not work with LibreOffice. NOTE: This package does not come with dictionaries, so you will have to install an additional language package. You shouldn’t have any problems finding them, all you have to do is search for the following in Synaptic: the letter “i” followed by the language you are looking for and you should get a result. If nothing comes up it could be that you misspelled something or maybe the dictionary has not been compiled yet, sorry. :(

    ispanish – This is one example of an additional language package that you would have to download for ispell. This particular package is the Spanish dictionary. Again, if you install this package without ispell it will not work. You must install ispell first

    aspell – This language package is fairly recent. It was supposed to replace the leading language package, “ispell.” It shares the same abilities as ispell, but it is better at handling personal dictionaries. However, aspell did not work for me in LibreOffice and it might be the go to package once they get it to work with LibreOffice. Well if it is your go to text editing program, otherwise you should not have any issues using this package.

    aspell-es – Just like ispell, aspell requires additional dictionaries to function. This particular example is of a Spanish dictionary. If Spanish is not what you are looking for just follow the following formula to find your language: “aspell-” (including the dash) followed by the first two letters of the language you are trying to find.

    myspell-es – This is the only language package that worked with LibreOffice. This is a standalone package so it does not need a “myspell” to be installed first.

    Although only one language package works with LibreOffice, I still recommend installing the other packages because it won’t hurt to have a computer that is ready to spell check in any program you use, besides they are easy to find and install in Synaptic.

    Well that is all that I have so far. If you have other language packages let us know! Also let us know what you think!



    Embarking on a Quest for a Tech Solutions2jtmgzbbc7af8pvuyd63zh1mfwncrlvEmbarking on a Quest for a Tech Solution

    By jessica on June 20, 2013
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.iayqy0tfp68zm52fgwcbhdp29gpt3tjc

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.lblot9gyw4wqy1xqken2p16v64s6o510

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)
    7c94pi3hm22zaxaknexbyq4p3adia0j7

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.yu7h63wr50s7im35uzdk4qa9wbp0f8p3

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.r6g2xarvx4ysmlxvahj4z0na8fo86own

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.7mfcra96g5m7d1a529j2t0thekhrddia

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.5julk89zfos32y4wbizg3yxnh5p8zyku

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?btwzq5hdjdzu3hylxado11ik38f6u9wv

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.uhrpuskky5orjksr9cflkyrvftcaacdv

    An RFP represents:l3musucaciuugen46k0oqb0b3zoxsvp3

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.egdx1j7w5l0x2w0umlprl3vvhl6m1cx5
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.zg0dxsufc166w9d57lh0urt6v9qgm6ec
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.2z5st1hxjzufqnpzsl9rkf9hswbap0dh

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.lniifok4yrjb5qjm34t5kb1rlgpw4lbg

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:firlovxq9d7esqddk5i8z4euzlp4e31j

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.i1e11418ybdn3l8o55rzostmvprxyvh6

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.tdnmsbxcrx28q2kel6yk226oqu8nqc79

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:ewskok1vyvph1yx8o68taqmi5hbzbppf

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.ixy0jbow5av8duajr5j2jf3b2ndbw164
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.3ylgxlbecq1ho85cd5bt931myayngvna
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.1dj7q2bpcrpwfn044eaq2k6slx86m18e

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.zbhh1jb1usdtn3ceeosndkczrk07bou1

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?3cmxfayjj812yh7pz5ke3qaanpkiv0to

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?byzjvbqrf36nvak2wd5hr3jqtdf5u0nw

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?ezmhr2d94iuepoxdhdx8z9h1q0zhxv52

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Embarking on a quest can be daunting. Embarking on a quest for a new technology project is especially so.

    On trips and quests in life, we often start by finding a map or connecting with someone else who has been down that road.

                   How to Write a Nonprofit
                    Request for Proposals (RFP)

    Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations trying to find new technology tools, often there is not such a clear way to begin. Also, there are a plethora of new technology tools available everyday, there are many myths about technology and tech experts, and there are often inconsistencies within organizations around the vision for the technology deliverable.

    Here at Aspiration, we are in awe of the on-the-ground work being done by nonprofits and community organizations. At the end of the day, this mission-critical work is priority, and technology decisions should support the same.

    That said, we believe that the Request for Proposal (RFP) process is a critical part in any enterprise-level nonprofit tech sourcing adventure.

    Taking the time to first articulate what they are looking for, helps nonprofits to save time and money by pinpointing what specific needs they have for the tech tool to fulfill. A Request for Proposal can help staff identify and develop a clear and shared vision for what they hope this new technology platform will accomplish.

    The material that goes into an RFP is also valuable fodder for engaging with the ultimate users of any new solution. It is a concrete touch point for asking questions like “is this what you need” and “what did we forget?

    A properly specified RFP is an essential tool in the backpack of anyone hoping to acquire accurately specified technology.

    An RFP represents:

    • A clear statement of your vision, ensuring that your organizational vision and the vision for the tech deliverable make sense.
    • An understanding of the processes that this tech tool needs to support at your organization.
    • A shared vocabulary, or bridge of understanding, that unifies project stakeholders and which ideally spans the life of the project and beyond.

    Aspiration has worked with many nonprofits over the years on their search for technology solutions, as well as with many technologists trying to develop technology tools that meet the unique needs of nonprofits. Aspiration Executive Director Allen Gunn shares his knowledge and experience in this webinar, “How to write a Nonprofit RFP“.

    For more information about putting together an RFP, including a template to get your started, check out:

    http://www.aspirationtech.org/training/workflow/templates/rfp.

    The concept of RFPs can be daunting to those who have not authored one, and even for those who understand the importance. This webinar attempts to demystify some of the confusion about how to write one, what to include, and when one is needed.

    Nonprofits have used the Aspiration RFP Process for projects such as:

    • Web site design and redesign, specifying target audiences and the specific benefits and utility the new or enhanced site will provide.
    • Database or CRM implementation, articulating what information needs to be managed and how it will support programmatic and operational objectives.
    • Vetting a technology strategy by describing how a tool or platform will connect the full range of stakeholders.

    Preparing an RFP, just like preparations for a trip, can help you to arrive pleasantly at your desired destination. And because technology deliverables are just milestones on a longer journey, RFPs can serve as valuable touchstones in your longer mission trek.

    So, what are your thoughts on this often-debated topic?

    What problems have you encountered when trying to find a tech solution?

    And what experiences have you had in trying to employ RFPs in your processes?



    Crash Course in Online Activismib05bf207rar58y31uc3mdeytysehy0pCrash Course in Online Activism

    By misty on April 26, 2013
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?4j89qxa568uszz9fagdlsf28wizcal45

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!aas6eci1sfjj113mf99urj56im7r6eh7

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?zmbj8gu7yhztai7p5x1m8mvi1495mz1c, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.e71vbn6m4g9x59wns3w8ht03im8gvxr0

    What is e-Advocacy?zmbj8gu7yhztai7p5x1m8mvi1495mz1c

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hubiaorulxedr6p7l0cgz3iqimau6or12za

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!fafjfzeg88ywu3a6qnp7uu0ji3rx85cd

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. f2lrzqj51aimf7984ise6lotsubnazbfCheck out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/8ag29zft009cvjk7uvb42iyhatar75u6

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.h7j6s4a6ojk7xmbitt4z9nkmoq450lv8

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!gw8xoot4fruv89jp39s5jdjzijsvf3jm

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Are you creating an online campaign with a group of young folks? Are you interested in becoming an activist?

    If you have an important story to share online, start here!

    Watch the video to get a 3 minute e-Advocacy crash course, What is e-Advocacy?, produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the Ryse Center’s Youth Organizing Team in Richmond, California. The video breaks down the ‘Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact’ and gives you ideas to help get the word out online.

    What is e-Advocacy?

    Produced by Jennifer Dueñas from the YO Hub

    CANFIT says, “Props to Ryse Center’s Organizing Hub for a fresh video on E-advocacy and online organizing!” We couldn’t agree more!

    We have a huge admiration for the Richmond Youth Organizing Team, CANFIT, and the Ryse Center in Richmond! Through a series of workshops and trainings, Aspiration had an amazing time working with them to build momentum for increased youth involvement in online organizing. CANFIT’s MO Youth e-Advocates Project engages youth in “e-Advocacy” and works directly with youth to expose them and their adult allies to the fast-evolving world of “online campaigning”. Check out more information from CANFIT on the Youth E-Advocacy project: http://canfit.org/our_work/programs/eadvocates/

    Download training materials on the Four Processes for Sustainable Online Impact.

    Follow the @RichmondYOT on Twitter to keep up with their game changing and community building work!



    Pain, Passion, Fame, and Funxhfggwlm2n95uvcuqyuw4p2ma2128euwPain, Passion, Fame, and Fun

    By misty on January 2, 2013
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?pxetkc8dma1c3etpsfilz14rwblcj36z

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.838joys1ikp8hz4ukyjghedi7uzefm2e

    Of course, this is easier said than done.tmezk8y280wzbvz5ozcq83ucm02rj033

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.xnjxfyklxx1858uyrg3zyrr50n4k3bjq

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.066dbq7lmv7hg47scywqpg8yfbpfp6jf

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:g3m4m7pe3wvw621j4pvnzev41fgxct3i

    Paincs6xni4c660b7beyco9k2zwoz43u8ica Paincs6xni4c660b7beyco9k2zwoz43u8ica is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passionyholmwu1swvzya3fqpmqbjma8c2a9xrx Passionyholmwu1swvzya3fqpmqbjma8c2a9xrx drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Fameuzydqtb3nun63ac80v8ffv0kwqnzx1ni Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.xi3tl2ymusbffopkldio51gvtw8t1wmo
    Funl9n7ah6igh06f7jrqnde3m0swzfpunf6 Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.cdzu8iy8uu59vkf45wh0ri993oaudpbf

    PAINxwmamrl9jsbipx9xqer9i68kztdoy1sl


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?jwaqh08rqph90b48tdjiqcnvegfi0vr9

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.r1mcx20zmkmdf50lq4nlwqfbk5s5ie5z

    PASSION5qnnxvffpu9ayfvzykjjzsgdibfkwldr


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.dbi9dwp53pfdd88uca44mn7bp0apdm8g

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Fameuzydqtb3nun63ac80v8ffv0kwqnzx1ni

    FAME0f46xuyxciu6f3vj1puxwdu11lrj29hs


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?0lhe1gi39a12cno6uqvswq2scm4lybvp

      Use Fameuzydqtb3nun63ac80v8ffv0kwqnzx1ni to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.fyvfnx089uwet1dqd9um0pe6me76bn3h
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.vet6zwijrvkt1yq0njcktp2dsjz7ibp4
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.6q2973d5kg8d5yk831hmpyww4myw9rd5

    FUNkflkqwaknqvb67fmtzd190xy2b3bmglw


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.0v2t1vadnr1qw5aw39vy2i3npgdualp1

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.3e7rfnfeu78zqj6qp96qbo2zmmypez78

    Value Delivery is Key7fu7ae2wjmvqje0198xy1uhr0qi0y9ov

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.sy0n6n7x83jzvadudq8qa1ylfe3u1mnk

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.01c94oh5lf6ka4q79gbaxw6i32xyzmhq

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.rnow27rvisco7yl26pfwl9xya8smh5dz

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?p3m5v6roztikfvybxgwavqk4ec2m5agk

    We’d love to hear more ideas!x7yat7jedn5oupb6cohwjmbk3jfrmbba

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Have you been thinking about how to get people to care about the information you are putting online?

    As you begin the process to engage people in the offline or online world, you have to figure out how your messaging reaches the people you care about by tapping into what they actually really care about. On top of that, you have to figure out not only how to reach your audience but also to balance the priority of these messages for your staff’s work time.

    Of course, this is easier said than done.

    To help get through this hurdle, we have a couple filters we like to run our online messages through to really think if the content might be engaging, based on what we are trying to get done vs. what other people’s motivations really are. We named these so-called “filters” the two P’s and two F’s.

    What do we mean by that? Let me tell you.

    The 2 P’s and 2 F’s are ways to think about if your online messages inspire action and give value to your constituency. We describe them as the following:

    Pain Pain is motivation. What causes your people pain? and; what encourages them through their struggle?
    Passion Passion drives the work. Tap into your people that care about what you care about.
    Fame Weave your community into your messaging. Give people online fame and draw attention to things besides yourself.
    Fun Celebrate your work! Convey the joy and emotion in what you’re doing.

    PAIN


    To understand your stakeholders is key. An easy way to start is by asking, What causes them the most pain? What needs are not met in your community?

    Find common areas of pain among your people. Then, use this knowledge to identify how those pain points are being messaged in your website and your email newsletters. Figure out points of crisis or injury to identify points of need.

    PASSION


    There are always a group of people that care about what you are working on. The goal is to tap into that passion that already exists in your network and give voice to the people that are feeling what you are feeling.

    When you tap into people’s passions, make sure to always give them the opportunity for a small amount of ownership (Tag in a photo, Name check, Invite to an event as a guest, Ask to share with friends). The act of acknowledgement will give you the space to build an online presence engaging folks with continued small, well-defined asks. This leads us to Fame…

    FAME


    Weave your base and your community into your online narrative and messaging. Organizations are in a paradigm where they have to talk about themselves and their successes for funding purposes. How can we turn this around and highlight people in your network that are doing amazing work around the issues that you’re collectively working on?

      Use Fame to bridge Online and Offline Work

    • If you want people to come to your protest – you better have gone to a couple of protests.
    • Making people part of your narrative in a noncommittal way through social media and online communications gives them “fame” and by default engages them more.
    • Using the jpeg – posting people’s pictures on the Internet invokes the feeling of getting your name or picture in the local paper. It builds excitement, engagement, ownership.

    FUN


    You must convey the joy in what you are doing, even when you are working on serious issues. Look for the celebration of life or paint a narrative around what happens when your message/movement works. Build a transactional relationship that highlights the best case scenario and shows what the world can be – based on what actions that you want people to take.

    People want to join movements that look like they are having fun.

    Value Delivery is Key

    The 2p’s & 2f’s can be used to not only continue to engage already existing networks but also GROW networks by connecting with more people, which we sometimes forget or find too hard to do.

    At the end of the day, no matter what tricks or tips we apply, we must remember to always ask ourselves what value we are providing or creating for the people we are serving and if it’s what they really want.

    Special Thanks to notetakers from the CA Tech Fest in Fresno and Gunner for providing thoughts on this blog post.

    How do you motivate your people? What really gets them interested?

    We’d love to hear more ideas!



    Making a ‘Tweet This’ Button with # and @

    By jessica on September 5, 2012
    (English → Deutsch) View original
    Translators:

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?9rsf6m5s5jwkitiho2e8v9w10dr9kzuk

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.
    20nqgu0gl859xnsfdxffrnnohb6th4u9

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:b0m3ffb8m6uhncl010d5e5tp9c0blbim

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?
    ukis291kpgkzcoh0zk6m9ou69b1syk4i

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. 57hcd1yss9db3vp6zsjynqjfu5yriwyeAlso, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.4nym61g4baj8bb2y91jdg763hs8aokki

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #7p6l7nzn2xxvprkmx5u0r2frayyyouyl&%@tabz82qeaqun826alijsh81f30d8bxnv tweet?mtacs51ap1qm8edmkl3rzlfesu5v4nzh

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.g6kxkvwxiofpve8cjm9vddbyoynme4pk

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:elh6dceq0o3mlt2msd895ugma2w4jran

    • letters4pubtdoxw1q705fhpltcb762zqrr0anv
    • numbers5z2avyqkoqdhmdte8a14czjrogphbor7
    • special characters that have meaning in the URLd3xwthzak20kjp6rn14phc9ou4j4spmw

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.rsg7utfq5u6i2z26di15lxuabc727fep

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character space24k6o7qdt4zl4fgx995qhvsjydi50p7ss, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newsletters4pubtdoxw1q705fhpltcb762zqrr0anv. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.gqdumd7t6t2nj370tcgskwnz8zt30s56

    Share on Twitter Links that include #7p6l7nzn2xxvprkmx5u0r2frayyyouyl and @tabz82qeaqun826alijsh81f30d8bxnvocpgkwhjkop8ff2cpjju7qvwe457gshv

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.m957wvhuk7d5ocx4hb0s0q1319x85yli

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #7p6l7nzn2xxvprkmx5u0r2frayyyouyl">#7p6l7nzn2xxvprkmx5u0r2frayyyouylHashtag symbol and the #7p6l7nzn2xxvprkmx5u0r2frayyyouylfunctionality">@tabz82qeaqun826alijsh81f30d8bxnvMention symbol.nyix00k1zhkjlg9atvl614sedcuclk1z

    Common Characters for a Tweet:9hnvd9pjof8axbl3wudf9s87rze5nvzm
    URL Encodinghl00bszs2swwcnhya3yifoh5g59b5edd Characterdajbclwp5jjbdfuu0kvgi8jpwuf8jmmm Descriptionlvdfa56xje6esrp7fsg153a520rdimzu
    %20uh8j8ognf9uh732ku014bh139p400nck space24k6o7qdt4zl4fgx995qhvsjydi50p7s a space24k6o7qdt4zl4fgx995qhvsjydi50p7s between words in a tweet
    %23gkcyr3pwnkrr9w78iwqw25ns29ks5r1b #7p6l7nzn2xxvprkmx5u0r2frayyyouyl hashtag to categorize tweet7zx2aq19u314sggjybjr8s8xznd6fo1d
    %40loyvs1g7xv62t9bfosg7cvsifc04cxtn @tabz82qeaqun826alijsh81f30d8bxnv at sign to mention another twitter user7zuaqwmcdzz3ruk6tzfpkakh1o0o74e4

    Let’s take a look:2ov3r7j9z9m0amy2jgc56dmk0w6mlune

    To make a link that works, just replace space24k6o7qdt4zl4fgx995qhvsjydi50p7ss and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    That sends the user to this:d0kegkixtr8jdheyc4eovnt7f1tu4r77

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:rmpxiegxjmy3747kcynqyurcz3f455rm

    • Blue is the HTML codebh6xg8s7ul6eo3aett00daemd5koxdczro1u3xsupa31dupqn6u6nd4wkn4nscqa
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link9xmpr7a0cmubwj563lhfoakb0rcp30y3pmzmwwan7try3skhextkgc937rwnyzte
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved charactersn4609ipxxwzqxt02tkvcsu3vyyhnzqpdg8t8ufkvl6wji4xcb5f6m7iidxqaxio3
    • Red is the text of the tweetoewzulrkol4zj1w0v8l4alx26owdalaotfvjdqhs6y1y0vaq14bk7r12bldpboeu
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet9x1fqvwkdiarde9byqdvirvdlbz7dyaccpl0gtjxymo8nm662bicp1wa1ctg4lj6
    • Black is what the link will sayx4vpvm7isne49uz7xnnqgc97jcc5umti

    Make a Buttonttwivf4fdxk1s4v464ko1xtr010l8c2s

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.b34hxi514moawuqj6b9fjnmf6pxbi76j

    Use code like this:5q41rb2a8ehn52g7p1nax7c7skds33jy

    • Blue is the HTML codebh6xg8s7ul6eo3aett00daemd5koxdczro1u3xsupa31dupqn6u6nd4wkn4nscqa
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link9xmpr7a0cmubwj563lhfoakb0rcp30y3pmzmwwan7try3skhextkgc937rwnyzte
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved charactersn4609ipxxwzqxt02tkvcsu3vyyhnzqpdg8t8ufkvl6wji4xcb5f6m7iidxqaxio3
    • Red is the text of the tweetoewzulrkol4zj1w0v8l4alx26owdalaotfvjdqhs6y1y0vaq14bk7r12bldpboeu
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet9x1fqvwkdiarde9byqdvirvdlbz7dyaccpl0gtjxymo8nm662bicp1wa1ctg4lj6
    • Aqua is the image linkrpaesyy7npx0zm4qhx2m0i8ks1egncw5
    • Black is what the link will sayx4vpvm7isne49uz7xnnqgc97jcc5umti if pictures are not loaded

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?pvff0i0gxgwmj888knqq5rv4s0x8s187

     dmzb6fqu153uk91x7ymy3ux2dl35nt1q

    (original) View Deutsch translation

    Are you trying to set up a “Tweet This” link in your email newsletter but it keeps looking funny or not including all the text?

    Last year, Matt wrote one of Social Source Common’s most popular blog posts that details Creating “Share This on Facebook/Twitter” Links.
    The post includes what code is needed to create an auto-tweet or auto-share link.

    In this post we will dive deeper into “tweet this” links, including:

    Why not use the buttons supplied by
    Twitter button builder?

    Twitter offers an “easy” way to create your own button and twitter developers provide information about creating and using tweet buttons. The problem with buttons built in Twitter’s button generator is that they require Javascript. While this works fine for websites, Javascript is either stripped, or disabled in most email clients, because it is commonly used by spammers. So, if you include a ‘tweet this’ button in your HTML email newsblast it is likely that it just won’t work. Also, your email blasting service may flag any HTML code containing Javascript.

    Why do I have to use these special characters just to do a #&%@ tweet?

    When you create a “share this” link on twitter starting with
    http://twitter.com/share?text=…“> you are creating an URL that leads to a tweet composition page where text is already entered. That means that the text you want to show up in the tweet needs to be part of the link.

    When you pass information through an URL link, you need to make sure it uses only allowed characters like:

    • letters
    • numbers
    • special characters that have meaning in the URL

    Any other characters in your tweet link will mess things up.

    For instance, sometimes we use a / symbol when we make a tweet to save precious character spaces, like “I have a love/hate relationship with my office chair.” Usually, this works fine. But, we cannot put a / symbol in a ‘share this’ tweet link in email newsletters. The / symbol is mistaken as something else and your ‘tweet this’ link will not work properly. To that end, we must use other funky ways to tell the code exactly what we want. It’s pretty easy once you get the hang of it, I promise.

    This funky thing we do so we can use symbols in our tweet is called “URL encoding“. URL Encoding is special combinations of characters in a URL that are interpreted as other characters.

    Share on Twitter Links that include # and @

    Creating a HTML link to automatically fill in some Tweet text is pretty simple and you will avoid all that Javascript trouble. You just need to know some additional code to stick into the HTML link code. You may want to check out Matt’s original post about creating share this on twitter links first.

    Some of the most common symbols needed for a good tweet are also those that cause problems in the URL code. They include the #Hashtag symbol and the @Mention symbol.

    Common Characters for a Tweet:
    URL Encoding Character Description
    %20 space a space between words in a tweet
    %23 # hashtag to categorize tweet
    %40 @ at sign to mention another twitter user

    Let’s take a look:

    To make a link that works, just replace spaces and special characters in your tweet text with their URL encoding equal.

    For a link like this: Share This on Twitter

    That sends the user to this:

    Example Share This Tweet

    …use the following code:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Black is what the link will say

    Make a Button

    If you want to make it a button, just make the link an image instead of text.

    For a button like this: Tweet This

    Use code like this:

    • Blue is the HTML code
    • Green is the code that gets Twitter to generate a tweet through a link
    • Purple are the URL encoding reserved characters
    • Red is the text of the tweet
    • Orange is the URL that will be included in the tweet
    • Aqua is the image link
    • Black is what the link will say if pictures are not loaded

    If you found this post useful, go ahead and Tweet about it!

    What other tips or tricks do you have for creating “share this” links or buttons?

     



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